Eggs for Every Meal


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So I have this theory about why eggs are a breakfast food: the original chicken farmer was sleeping soundly after a long day in the field and when a rooster woke him too early, he was so upset that he took revenge by eating the rooster’s unborn children. The farmer, clearly unstable, realized only a fraction of the egg’s potential and doomed us all to a fate filled with unimaginative egg meals—a fate worse than death (in my humble opinion).

Courtesy of giphy.com

So, it’s time to step out of the breakfast box because this versatile, delicious and inexpensive ingredient can be featured in any meal. Here’s how:

1. Breakfast (obviously)

Photo by Parisa Soraya

Spice it up, literally. Everyone has a favorite egg preparation, so try adding some zing to your dish: beat Sriracha in a bowl with eggs before scrambling, or sprinkle red pepper flakes in the pan while the eggs cook. Also try folding jalapenos into an omelet (the more seeds you leave, the hotter it will be) with cheddar and cilantro.

2. Lunch

Courtesy of www.insidenanabreadshead.com

Egg sandwiches are about as easy as any other sandwich and even more delicious. Most sandwich eggs are prepared over easy (for a runny yolk) or over hard (for a cooked yolk). The classic: nestle the egg between toasted bread, lettuce, tomato and mayo. Add avocado if you’re part of the 99% who thinks everything tastes better with avocado. Or take a cue from the French who boast a far more developed egg game: add a fried egg on top of your grilled ham and cheese for a Croque Madame. Delicieux.

3. Dinner

Courtesy of thestyledossier.blogspot.com

Baked eggs are easy to make and easy to eat. In the style of either a frittata or a casserole, eggs that you can pop in the oven are an appealing option over that box of mac’ n cheese you had planned … again. Beat eggs then add sautéed veggies like asparagus or onions, cubed bread, cheese or even baked potatoes. It’s a super delicious way to get those much-neglected nutrients and it lasts a couple meals. Eat a slice with salad for dinner, then save the rest for later. Seriously eggcellent.

The post Eggs for Every Meal appeared first on Spoon University.


10 Creative Ways to Enjoy Eggs for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner

Eggs are a nutritious and versatile food, making them a no-brainer addition to any meal. Here are several ways to incorporate eggs into your day.

With eggs at your disposal, you can easily whip up a quick meal any time of day.

When you need a filling, nutritious food in a pinch, look no further than eggs. Whether scrambled, hard-boiled, or poached, you can fit eggs into practically any meal.

“Eggs are a great option for breakfast, lunch, and dinner because they are versatile, budget-friendly, and add protein to any meal,” says Rachel Helfferich, a registered dietitian nutritionist in Chicago. One large egg provides roughly 6 grams (g) of protein, according to estimates from the US Department of Agriculture (USDA).

“Most of the protein is found in the egg white. However, be sure not to skimp on the yolk as this is where vitamin D, healthy fats, and other essential nutrients are stored,” Helfferich says.

According to Harvard University, your protein needs depend on your weight. (To find out how much you’re best off getting, take your weight in pounds and multiply it by 0.36.) For a 125-pound person, for example, 45 g of protein per day would meet that threshold.

But that’s not all this kitchen staple offers: Eggs are also packed with essential nutrients like vitamin B12, omega-3 fatty acids, and — perhaps most notably — vitamin D. “Very few foods naturally contain vitamin D, which is important for bone, immune, and muscular health,” says Kelly Jones, RD, a board-certified sports dietitian in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. A single large egg provides 1 microgram (mcg), or 6 percent of your DV of vitamin D, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Eggs are also an excellent source of choline (1 egg offers 169 milligrams, or 31 percent of the DV), an essential nutrient that supports memory, mood, muscle control, and other brain and nervous system functions, notes the USDA. "Like vitamin D, many people don’t obtain enough choline,” Jones says. “It’s especially important for pregnant and nursing women to [get choline to] aid in the healthy brain development of the fetus,” she adds.

Here are 10 creative egg recipes to make for breakfast, lunch, or dinner this week.


10 Creative Ways to Enjoy Eggs for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner

Eggs are a nutritious and versatile food, making them a no-brainer addition to any meal. Here are several ways to incorporate eggs into your day.

With eggs at your disposal, you can easily whip up a quick meal any time of day.

When you need a filling, nutritious food in a pinch, look no further than eggs. Whether scrambled, hard-boiled, or poached, you can fit eggs into practically any meal.

“Eggs are a great option for breakfast, lunch, and dinner because they are versatile, budget-friendly, and add protein to any meal,” says Rachel Helfferich, a registered dietitian nutritionist in Chicago. One large egg provides roughly 6 grams (g) of protein, according to estimates from the US Department of Agriculture (USDA).

“Most of the protein is found in the egg white. However, be sure not to skimp on the yolk as this is where vitamin D, healthy fats, and other essential nutrients are stored,” Helfferich says.

According to Harvard University, your protein needs depend on your weight. (To find out how much you’re best off getting, take your weight in pounds and multiply it by 0.36.) For a 125-pound person, for example, 45 g of protein per day would meet that threshold.

But that’s not all this kitchen staple offers: Eggs are also packed with essential nutrients like vitamin B12, omega-3 fatty acids, and — perhaps most notably — vitamin D. “Very few foods naturally contain vitamin D, which is important for bone, immune, and muscular health,” says Kelly Jones, RD, a board-certified sports dietitian in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. A single large egg provides 1 microgram (mcg), or 6 percent of your DV of vitamin D, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Eggs are also an excellent source of choline (1 egg offers 169 milligrams, or 31 percent of the DV), an essential nutrient that supports memory, mood, muscle control, and other brain and nervous system functions, notes the USDA. "Like vitamin D, many people don’t obtain enough choline,” Jones says. “It’s especially important for pregnant and nursing women to [get choline to] aid in the healthy brain development of the fetus,” she adds.

Here are 10 creative egg recipes to make for breakfast, lunch, or dinner this week.


10 Creative Ways to Enjoy Eggs for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner

Eggs are a nutritious and versatile food, making them a no-brainer addition to any meal. Here are several ways to incorporate eggs into your day.

With eggs at your disposal, you can easily whip up a quick meal any time of day.

When you need a filling, nutritious food in a pinch, look no further than eggs. Whether scrambled, hard-boiled, or poached, you can fit eggs into practically any meal.

“Eggs are a great option for breakfast, lunch, and dinner because they are versatile, budget-friendly, and add protein to any meal,” says Rachel Helfferich, a registered dietitian nutritionist in Chicago. One large egg provides roughly 6 grams (g) of protein, according to estimates from the US Department of Agriculture (USDA).

“Most of the protein is found in the egg white. However, be sure not to skimp on the yolk as this is where vitamin D, healthy fats, and other essential nutrients are stored,” Helfferich says.

According to Harvard University, your protein needs depend on your weight. (To find out how much you’re best off getting, take your weight in pounds and multiply it by 0.36.) For a 125-pound person, for example, 45 g of protein per day would meet that threshold.

But that’s not all this kitchen staple offers: Eggs are also packed with essential nutrients like vitamin B12, omega-3 fatty acids, and — perhaps most notably — vitamin D. “Very few foods naturally contain vitamin D, which is important for bone, immune, and muscular health,” says Kelly Jones, RD, a board-certified sports dietitian in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. A single large egg provides 1 microgram (mcg), or 6 percent of your DV of vitamin D, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Eggs are also an excellent source of choline (1 egg offers 169 milligrams, or 31 percent of the DV), an essential nutrient that supports memory, mood, muscle control, and other brain and nervous system functions, notes the USDA. "Like vitamin D, many people don’t obtain enough choline,” Jones says. “It’s especially important for pregnant and nursing women to [get choline to] aid in the healthy brain development of the fetus,” she adds.

Here are 10 creative egg recipes to make for breakfast, lunch, or dinner this week.


10 Creative Ways to Enjoy Eggs for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner

Eggs are a nutritious and versatile food, making them a no-brainer addition to any meal. Here are several ways to incorporate eggs into your day.

With eggs at your disposal, you can easily whip up a quick meal any time of day.

When you need a filling, nutritious food in a pinch, look no further than eggs. Whether scrambled, hard-boiled, or poached, you can fit eggs into practically any meal.

“Eggs are a great option for breakfast, lunch, and dinner because they are versatile, budget-friendly, and add protein to any meal,” says Rachel Helfferich, a registered dietitian nutritionist in Chicago. One large egg provides roughly 6 grams (g) of protein, according to estimates from the US Department of Agriculture (USDA).

“Most of the protein is found in the egg white. However, be sure not to skimp on the yolk as this is where vitamin D, healthy fats, and other essential nutrients are stored,” Helfferich says.

According to Harvard University, your protein needs depend on your weight. (To find out how much you’re best off getting, take your weight in pounds and multiply it by 0.36.) For a 125-pound person, for example, 45 g of protein per day would meet that threshold.

But that’s not all this kitchen staple offers: Eggs are also packed with essential nutrients like vitamin B12, omega-3 fatty acids, and — perhaps most notably — vitamin D. “Very few foods naturally contain vitamin D, which is important for bone, immune, and muscular health,” says Kelly Jones, RD, a board-certified sports dietitian in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. A single large egg provides 1 microgram (mcg), or 6 percent of your DV of vitamin D, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Eggs are also an excellent source of choline (1 egg offers 169 milligrams, or 31 percent of the DV), an essential nutrient that supports memory, mood, muscle control, and other brain and nervous system functions, notes the USDA. "Like vitamin D, many people don’t obtain enough choline,” Jones says. “It’s especially important for pregnant and nursing women to [get choline to] aid in the healthy brain development of the fetus,” she adds.

Here are 10 creative egg recipes to make for breakfast, lunch, or dinner this week.


10 Creative Ways to Enjoy Eggs for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner

Eggs are a nutritious and versatile food, making them a no-brainer addition to any meal. Here are several ways to incorporate eggs into your day.

With eggs at your disposal, you can easily whip up a quick meal any time of day.

When you need a filling, nutritious food in a pinch, look no further than eggs. Whether scrambled, hard-boiled, or poached, you can fit eggs into practically any meal.

“Eggs are a great option for breakfast, lunch, and dinner because they are versatile, budget-friendly, and add protein to any meal,” says Rachel Helfferich, a registered dietitian nutritionist in Chicago. One large egg provides roughly 6 grams (g) of protein, according to estimates from the US Department of Agriculture (USDA).

“Most of the protein is found in the egg white. However, be sure not to skimp on the yolk as this is where vitamin D, healthy fats, and other essential nutrients are stored,” Helfferich says.

According to Harvard University, your protein needs depend on your weight. (To find out how much you’re best off getting, take your weight in pounds and multiply it by 0.36.) For a 125-pound person, for example, 45 g of protein per day would meet that threshold.

But that’s not all this kitchen staple offers: Eggs are also packed with essential nutrients like vitamin B12, omega-3 fatty acids, and — perhaps most notably — vitamin D. “Very few foods naturally contain vitamin D, which is important for bone, immune, and muscular health,” says Kelly Jones, RD, a board-certified sports dietitian in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. A single large egg provides 1 microgram (mcg), or 6 percent of your DV of vitamin D, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Eggs are also an excellent source of choline (1 egg offers 169 milligrams, or 31 percent of the DV), an essential nutrient that supports memory, mood, muscle control, and other brain and nervous system functions, notes the USDA. "Like vitamin D, many people don’t obtain enough choline,” Jones says. “It’s especially important for pregnant and nursing women to [get choline to] aid in the healthy brain development of the fetus,” she adds.

Here are 10 creative egg recipes to make for breakfast, lunch, or dinner this week.


10 Creative Ways to Enjoy Eggs for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner

Eggs are a nutritious and versatile food, making them a no-brainer addition to any meal. Here are several ways to incorporate eggs into your day.

With eggs at your disposal, you can easily whip up a quick meal any time of day.

When you need a filling, nutritious food in a pinch, look no further than eggs. Whether scrambled, hard-boiled, or poached, you can fit eggs into practically any meal.

“Eggs are a great option for breakfast, lunch, and dinner because they are versatile, budget-friendly, and add protein to any meal,” says Rachel Helfferich, a registered dietitian nutritionist in Chicago. One large egg provides roughly 6 grams (g) of protein, according to estimates from the US Department of Agriculture (USDA).

“Most of the protein is found in the egg white. However, be sure not to skimp on the yolk as this is where vitamin D, healthy fats, and other essential nutrients are stored,” Helfferich says.

According to Harvard University, your protein needs depend on your weight. (To find out how much you’re best off getting, take your weight in pounds and multiply it by 0.36.) For a 125-pound person, for example, 45 g of protein per day would meet that threshold.

But that’s not all this kitchen staple offers: Eggs are also packed with essential nutrients like vitamin B12, omega-3 fatty acids, and — perhaps most notably — vitamin D. “Very few foods naturally contain vitamin D, which is important for bone, immune, and muscular health,” says Kelly Jones, RD, a board-certified sports dietitian in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. A single large egg provides 1 microgram (mcg), or 6 percent of your DV of vitamin D, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Eggs are also an excellent source of choline (1 egg offers 169 milligrams, or 31 percent of the DV), an essential nutrient that supports memory, mood, muscle control, and other brain and nervous system functions, notes the USDA. "Like vitamin D, many people don’t obtain enough choline,” Jones says. “It’s especially important for pregnant and nursing women to [get choline to] aid in the healthy brain development of the fetus,” she adds.

Here are 10 creative egg recipes to make for breakfast, lunch, or dinner this week.


10 Creative Ways to Enjoy Eggs for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner

Eggs are a nutritious and versatile food, making them a no-brainer addition to any meal. Here are several ways to incorporate eggs into your day.

With eggs at your disposal, you can easily whip up a quick meal any time of day.

When you need a filling, nutritious food in a pinch, look no further than eggs. Whether scrambled, hard-boiled, or poached, you can fit eggs into practically any meal.

“Eggs are a great option for breakfast, lunch, and dinner because they are versatile, budget-friendly, and add protein to any meal,” says Rachel Helfferich, a registered dietitian nutritionist in Chicago. One large egg provides roughly 6 grams (g) of protein, according to estimates from the US Department of Agriculture (USDA).

“Most of the protein is found in the egg white. However, be sure not to skimp on the yolk as this is where vitamin D, healthy fats, and other essential nutrients are stored,” Helfferich says.

According to Harvard University, your protein needs depend on your weight. (To find out how much you’re best off getting, take your weight in pounds and multiply it by 0.36.) For a 125-pound person, for example, 45 g of protein per day would meet that threshold.

But that’s not all this kitchen staple offers: Eggs are also packed with essential nutrients like vitamin B12, omega-3 fatty acids, and — perhaps most notably — vitamin D. “Very few foods naturally contain vitamin D, which is important for bone, immune, and muscular health,” says Kelly Jones, RD, a board-certified sports dietitian in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. A single large egg provides 1 microgram (mcg), or 6 percent of your DV of vitamin D, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Eggs are also an excellent source of choline (1 egg offers 169 milligrams, or 31 percent of the DV), an essential nutrient that supports memory, mood, muscle control, and other brain and nervous system functions, notes the USDA. "Like vitamin D, many people don’t obtain enough choline,” Jones says. “It’s especially important for pregnant and nursing women to [get choline to] aid in the healthy brain development of the fetus,” she adds.

Here are 10 creative egg recipes to make for breakfast, lunch, or dinner this week.


10 Creative Ways to Enjoy Eggs for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner

Eggs are a nutritious and versatile food, making them a no-brainer addition to any meal. Here are several ways to incorporate eggs into your day.

With eggs at your disposal, you can easily whip up a quick meal any time of day.

When you need a filling, nutritious food in a pinch, look no further than eggs. Whether scrambled, hard-boiled, or poached, you can fit eggs into practically any meal.

“Eggs are a great option for breakfast, lunch, and dinner because they are versatile, budget-friendly, and add protein to any meal,” says Rachel Helfferich, a registered dietitian nutritionist in Chicago. One large egg provides roughly 6 grams (g) of protein, according to estimates from the US Department of Agriculture (USDA).

“Most of the protein is found in the egg white. However, be sure not to skimp on the yolk as this is where vitamin D, healthy fats, and other essential nutrients are stored,” Helfferich says.

According to Harvard University, your protein needs depend on your weight. (To find out how much you’re best off getting, take your weight in pounds and multiply it by 0.36.) For a 125-pound person, for example, 45 g of protein per day would meet that threshold.

But that’s not all this kitchen staple offers: Eggs are also packed with essential nutrients like vitamin B12, omega-3 fatty acids, and — perhaps most notably — vitamin D. “Very few foods naturally contain vitamin D, which is important for bone, immune, and muscular health,” says Kelly Jones, RD, a board-certified sports dietitian in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. A single large egg provides 1 microgram (mcg), or 6 percent of your DV of vitamin D, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Eggs are also an excellent source of choline (1 egg offers 169 milligrams, or 31 percent of the DV), an essential nutrient that supports memory, mood, muscle control, and other brain and nervous system functions, notes the USDA. "Like vitamin D, many people don’t obtain enough choline,” Jones says. “It’s especially important for pregnant and nursing women to [get choline to] aid in the healthy brain development of the fetus,” she adds.

Here are 10 creative egg recipes to make for breakfast, lunch, or dinner this week.


10 Creative Ways to Enjoy Eggs for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner

Eggs are a nutritious and versatile food, making them a no-brainer addition to any meal. Here are several ways to incorporate eggs into your day.

With eggs at your disposal, you can easily whip up a quick meal any time of day.

When you need a filling, nutritious food in a pinch, look no further than eggs. Whether scrambled, hard-boiled, or poached, you can fit eggs into practically any meal.

“Eggs are a great option for breakfast, lunch, and dinner because they are versatile, budget-friendly, and add protein to any meal,” says Rachel Helfferich, a registered dietitian nutritionist in Chicago. One large egg provides roughly 6 grams (g) of protein, according to estimates from the US Department of Agriculture (USDA).

“Most of the protein is found in the egg white. However, be sure not to skimp on the yolk as this is where vitamin D, healthy fats, and other essential nutrients are stored,” Helfferich says.

According to Harvard University, your protein needs depend on your weight. (To find out how much you’re best off getting, take your weight in pounds and multiply it by 0.36.) For a 125-pound person, for example, 45 g of protein per day would meet that threshold.

But that’s not all this kitchen staple offers: Eggs are also packed with essential nutrients like vitamin B12, omega-3 fatty acids, and — perhaps most notably — vitamin D. “Very few foods naturally contain vitamin D, which is important for bone, immune, and muscular health,” says Kelly Jones, RD, a board-certified sports dietitian in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. A single large egg provides 1 microgram (mcg), or 6 percent of your DV of vitamin D, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Eggs are also an excellent source of choline (1 egg offers 169 milligrams, or 31 percent of the DV), an essential nutrient that supports memory, mood, muscle control, and other brain and nervous system functions, notes the USDA. "Like vitamin D, many people don’t obtain enough choline,” Jones says. “It’s especially important for pregnant and nursing women to [get choline to] aid in the healthy brain development of the fetus,” she adds.

Here are 10 creative egg recipes to make for breakfast, lunch, or dinner this week.


10 Creative Ways to Enjoy Eggs for Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner

Eggs are a nutritious and versatile food, making them a no-brainer addition to any meal. Here are several ways to incorporate eggs into your day.

With eggs at your disposal, you can easily whip up a quick meal any time of day.

When you need a filling, nutritious food in a pinch, look no further than eggs. Whether scrambled, hard-boiled, or poached, you can fit eggs into practically any meal.

“Eggs are a great option for breakfast, lunch, and dinner because they are versatile, budget-friendly, and add protein to any meal,” says Rachel Helfferich, a registered dietitian nutritionist in Chicago. One large egg provides roughly 6 grams (g) of protein, according to estimates from the US Department of Agriculture (USDA).

“Most of the protein is found in the egg white. However, be sure not to skimp on the yolk as this is where vitamin D, healthy fats, and other essential nutrients are stored,” Helfferich says.

According to Harvard University, your protein needs depend on your weight. (To find out how much you’re best off getting, take your weight in pounds and multiply it by 0.36.) For a 125-pound person, for example, 45 g of protein per day would meet that threshold.

But that’s not all this kitchen staple offers: Eggs are also packed with essential nutrients like vitamin B12, omega-3 fatty acids, and — perhaps most notably — vitamin D. “Very few foods naturally contain vitamin D, which is important for bone, immune, and muscular health,” says Kelly Jones, RD, a board-certified sports dietitian in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. A single large egg provides 1 microgram (mcg), or 6 percent of your DV of vitamin D, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Eggs are also an excellent source of choline (1 egg offers 169 milligrams, or 31 percent of the DV), an essential nutrient that supports memory, mood, muscle control, and other brain and nervous system functions, notes the USDA. "Like vitamin D, many people don’t obtain enough choline,” Jones says. “It’s especially important for pregnant and nursing women to [get choline to] aid in the healthy brain development of the fetus,” she adds.

Here are 10 creative egg recipes to make for breakfast, lunch, or dinner this week.



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