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Roux: Two Steps to Take Your Sauce & Soup to the Next Level

Roux: Two Steps to Take Your Sauce & Soup to the Next Level



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1. It’s always there for you when you make a mistake.

Adding a small dollop of roux will thicken any sauce or soup right back up without leaving behind globs of undissolved flour that burst in your mouth like a dry, starchy Boba.

2. It can amp up the flavor of any sauce without upstaging the true star.

By cooking the roux for an extended period of time, you can add another dimension of toasted smokiness. Almost always dark brown, the roux incorporated into a gumbo is packed with chocolatey and nutty flavors.

3. It’s remarkably versatile.

Butter and flour are not your only options. For bacon lovers out there, many a roux has been made with leftover bacon grease; the resulted product is as deadly as it comes, in both flavor and calories. If you want to cut a few extra calories or go gluten-free, try using corn starch as a flour substitute.

4. There is just so much to love.

It’s the base of all your favorite comfort soups and sauces: New England Clam Chowder, your Mom’s Thanksgiving gravy, homemade mac and cheese sauce… Warning: It may cause some homesickness as a side effect.

To sum it up, a roux would make the perfect boyfriend.

Here are a few basic steps on how to get it into your life and your cooking.

What you will need:
1/4 cup butter
3/8 cup flour

1. Add butter to pan and heat over low-medium heat until completely melted.

2. Once the butter is completely melted, stir in flour with a wooden spoon.

3. Continue stirring until all the butter and flour is smoothly blended. The roux should be thick enough that you can push it around the pan as one glob without leaving any behind, while also thin enough that you do not see any residual flour (unless it’s stuck to the pan).

Et voilà! The gateway to the world of creamy soups and sauces is at your fingertips. Just add your roux in small portions to broth or milk over medium heat. Check out this article for a tangy twist on Mac and Cheese. [Link article I'm submitting in a few days].

View the original post, Roux: Two Steps to Take Your Sauce & Soup to the Next Level, on Spoon University.

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Veloute Sauce Recipe

Don’t get nervous about the names of some of these classic sauces like velouté (veh-loo-TAY). It’s a fancy French name for a white sauce that is stock based and thickened with a white roux.

The stock used is usually chicken, veal, or fish. Velouté is considered one of the five ‘mother sauces’ that almost all of the classic French sauces are derived from.

Most classic white sauces are derived from Velouté sauce, which is just a white stock (veal, chicken, or fish for example) that has been thickened with a white roux (an equal combination of flour and fat, typically butter).

The difference between a white stock and a brown stock is whether or not the bones it is made from have been roasted or not. Stocks made with roasted bones are considered brown.

From this basic Velouté sauce, you can create dozens of other sauces by introducing other ingredients. The two most famous classic sauces made from Velouté are Allemande (German Sauce) and Sauce Suprěme.


Veloute Sauce Recipe

Don’t get nervous about the names of some of these classic sauces like velouté (veh-loo-TAY). It’s a fancy French name for a white sauce that is stock based and thickened with a white roux.

The stock used is usually chicken, veal, or fish. Velouté is considered one of the five ‘mother sauces’ that almost all of the classic French sauces are derived from.

Most classic white sauces are derived from Velouté sauce, which is just a white stock (veal, chicken, or fish for example) that has been thickened with a white roux (an equal combination of flour and fat, typically butter).

The difference between a white stock and a brown stock is whether or not the bones it is made from have been roasted or not. Stocks made with roasted bones are considered brown.

From this basic Velouté sauce, you can create dozens of other sauces by introducing other ingredients. The two most famous classic sauces made from Velouté are Allemande (German Sauce) and Sauce Suprěme.


Veloute Sauce Recipe

Don’t get nervous about the names of some of these classic sauces like velouté (veh-loo-TAY). It’s a fancy French name for a white sauce that is stock based and thickened with a white roux.

The stock used is usually chicken, veal, or fish. Velouté is considered one of the five ‘mother sauces’ that almost all of the classic French sauces are derived from.

Most classic white sauces are derived from Velouté sauce, which is just a white stock (veal, chicken, or fish for example) that has been thickened with a white roux (an equal combination of flour and fat, typically butter).

The difference between a white stock and a brown stock is whether or not the bones it is made from have been roasted or not. Stocks made with roasted bones are considered brown.

From this basic Velouté sauce, you can create dozens of other sauces by introducing other ingredients. The two most famous classic sauces made from Velouté are Allemande (German Sauce) and Sauce Suprěme.


Veloute Sauce Recipe

Don’t get nervous about the names of some of these classic sauces like velouté (veh-loo-TAY). It’s a fancy French name for a white sauce that is stock based and thickened with a white roux.

The stock used is usually chicken, veal, or fish. Velouté is considered one of the five ‘mother sauces’ that almost all of the classic French sauces are derived from.

Most classic white sauces are derived from Velouté sauce, which is just a white stock (veal, chicken, or fish for example) that has been thickened with a white roux (an equal combination of flour and fat, typically butter).

The difference between a white stock and a brown stock is whether or not the bones it is made from have been roasted or not. Stocks made with roasted bones are considered brown.

From this basic Velouté sauce, you can create dozens of other sauces by introducing other ingredients. The two most famous classic sauces made from Velouté are Allemande (German Sauce) and Sauce Suprěme.


Veloute Sauce Recipe

Don’t get nervous about the names of some of these classic sauces like velouté (veh-loo-TAY). It’s a fancy French name for a white sauce that is stock based and thickened with a white roux.

The stock used is usually chicken, veal, or fish. Velouté is considered one of the five ‘mother sauces’ that almost all of the classic French sauces are derived from.

Most classic white sauces are derived from Velouté sauce, which is just a white stock (veal, chicken, or fish for example) that has been thickened with a white roux (an equal combination of flour and fat, typically butter).

The difference between a white stock and a brown stock is whether or not the bones it is made from have been roasted or not. Stocks made with roasted bones are considered brown.

From this basic Velouté sauce, you can create dozens of other sauces by introducing other ingredients. The two most famous classic sauces made from Velouté are Allemande (German Sauce) and Sauce Suprěme.


Veloute Sauce Recipe

Don’t get nervous about the names of some of these classic sauces like velouté (veh-loo-TAY). It’s a fancy French name for a white sauce that is stock based and thickened with a white roux.

The stock used is usually chicken, veal, or fish. Velouté is considered one of the five ‘mother sauces’ that almost all of the classic French sauces are derived from.

Most classic white sauces are derived from Velouté sauce, which is just a white stock (veal, chicken, or fish for example) that has been thickened with a white roux (an equal combination of flour and fat, typically butter).

The difference between a white stock and a brown stock is whether or not the bones it is made from have been roasted or not. Stocks made with roasted bones are considered brown.

From this basic Velouté sauce, you can create dozens of other sauces by introducing other ingredients. The two most famous classic sauces made from Velouté are Allemande (German Sauce) and Sauce Suprěme.


Veloute Sauce Recipe

Don’t get nervous about the names of some of these classic sauces like velouté (veh-loo-TAY). It’s a fancy French name for a white sauce that is stock based and thickened with a white roux.

The stock used is usually chicken, veal, or fish. Velouté is considered one of the five ‘mother sauces’ that almost all of the classic French sauces are derived from.

Most classic white sauces are derived from Velouté sauce, which is just a white stock (veal, chicken, or fish for example) that has been thickened with a white roux (an equal combination of flour and fat, typically butter).

The difference between a white stock and a brown stock is whether or not the bones it is made from have been roasted or not. Stocks made with roasted bones are considered brown.

From this basic Velouté sauce, you can create dozens of other sauces by introducing other ingredients. The two most famous classic sauces made from Velouté are Allemande (German Sauce) and Sauce Suprěme.


Veloute Sauce Recipe

Don’t get nervous about the names of some of these classic sauces like velouté (veh-loo-TAY). It’s a fancy French name for a white sauce that is stock based and thickened with a white roux.

The stock used is usually chicken, veal, or fish. Velouté is considered one of the five ‘mother sauces’ that almost all of the classic French sauces are derived from.

Most classic white sauces are derived from Velouté sauce, which is just a white stock (veal, chicken, or fish for example) that has been thickened with a white roux (an equal combination of flour and fat, typically butter).

The difference between a white stock and a brown stock is whether or not the bones it is made from have been roasted or not. Stocks made with roasted bones are considered brown.

From this basic Velouté sauce, you can create dozens of other sauces by introducing other ingredients. The two most famous classic sauces made from Velouté are Allemande (German Sauce) and Sauce Suprěme.


Veloute Sauce Recipe

Don’t get nervous about the names of some of these classic sauces like velouté (veh-loo-TAY). It’s a fancy French name for a white sauce that is stock based and thickened with a white roux.

The stock used is usually chicken, veal, or fish. Velouté is considered one of the five ‘mother sauces’ that almost all of the classic French sauces are derived from.

Most classic white sauces are derived from Velouté sauce, which is just a white stock (veal, chicken, or fish for example) that has been thickened with a white roux (an equal combination of flour and fat, typically butter).

The difference between a white stock and a brown stock is whether or not the bones it is made from have been roasted or not. Stocks made with roasted bones are considered brown.

From this basic Velouté sauce, you can create dozens of other sauces by introducing other ingredients. The two most famous classic sauces made from Velouté are Allemande (German Sauce) and Sauce Suprěme.


Veloute Sauce Recipe

Don’t get nervous about the names of some of these classic sauces like velouté (veh-loo-TAY). It’s a fancy French name for a white sauce that is stock based and thickened with a white roux.

The stock used is usually chicken, veal, or fish. Velouté is considered one of the five ‘mother sauces’ that almost all of the classic French sauces are derived from.

Most classic white sauces are derived from Velouté sauce, which is just a white stock (veal, chicken, or fish for example) that has been thickened with a white roux (an equal combination of flour and fat, typically butter).

The difference between a white stock and a brown stock is whether or not the bones it is made from have been roasted or not. Stocks made with roasted bones are considered brown.

From this basic Velouté sauce, you can create dozens of other sauces by introducing other ingredients. The two most famous classic sauces made from Velouté are Allemande (German Sauce) and Sauce Suprěme.


Watch the video: Roux Recipe - How to Make Roux (August 2022).