Best Kreplach Recipes

Kreplach Shopping Tips

Stock up on root vegetables like beets, turnips, and potatoes. They are a staple in Eastern European cuisine.

Kreplach Cooking Tips

Eastern European cuisine often involves slow-cooking methods. Pressure cookers can cut down on cooking time.


These Oniony, Meat-Filled Dumplings Are My Bubbe's Greatest Culinary Legacy

The only thing better than a good recipe? When something's so easy to make that you don't even need one. Welcome to It's That Simple, a column where we talk you through the process of making the dishes and drinks we can make with our eyes closed.

I wish I could report that these dumplings were part of my personal familial lore (and, to hear my mother tell it, they are). The recipe belonged to my bubbe, Molly, who passed away in the summer of 2017, but I don’t remember them. Instead, the culinary legacies of hers that I recall are sky-high lemon meringue pie, cranberry sauce, and, of course, tzimmes, a dish of simmered sweet potato and carrot that—with deep apologies to my ancestors—I never could stand.

When people think of dumplings, they may not immediately think of the food of my people, Jewish-American immigrants who have embraced a cultural mishmash of Eastern European tradition and food, wrapped up in an American retelling. But dumplings are part of our story, too. My bubbe called them kreplach, and she stuffed them with oniony ground meat. How they’re served depends largely on the moment. They can arrive in a bowl of hot chicken soup, or crispy from the oven, or even fried in hot oil. Like other varieties of dumplings, they are, at their core, a flexible comfort food, made from excess ingredients and access: Here is all that we have, these dumplings say.

Though I have no memories of her kreplach, when my mother dusted off the recipe for the Jewish high holidays this year, it occurred to me that this particular food is exactly the kind of recipe I search for when I’m stumbling to set the world straight. A dumpling has that sort of rousing power.

The recipe my mother sent, through no fault of her own, is unintelligible. My grandmother cooked through intuition, and her transcriptions were loose, and the notes she passed down were only a recitation of ingredients. The rest she left for us to figure out on our own. I have learned, through trial-and-error, to make this interpretation of my bubbe’s recipe, altering her filling, originally made only from ground beef, eggs, and salt.

To make kreplach (this recipe makes about 30), combine 2 ½ cups flour, 2 large beaten eggs, and ½ cup warm water until a dough forms. Knead the dough vigorously until it forms a ball that is not sticky to the touch, 3–5 minutes, and cover with a moist towel while you prepare the filling. For the filling, combine 1 pound ground beef, ½ onion, finely chopped, ½ teaspoon Worcestershire sauce, ¼ teaspoon granulated garlic, ¾ teaspoon kosher salt, and 1 lightly beaten egg. Mix until integrated.

Separate the dough into two balls and then roll each ball out on a lightly floured board to ¼" thick (if you intend to cook them in the oven, keep the dough slightly thicker). Cut with a pizza wheel into 3-inch squares. Fill each square with a spoonful of the meat mixture and fold it into a triangle, then wet the edges lightly with water and pinch closed to seal (you might need to use a little flour here to assist you).

Part of the magic of kreplach is that they can be served however you happen to need them: gently simmered, like wontons in broth, or crispy (and, as my mother would have them, accompanied by a jar of nasal passage-clearing Ba Tempte mustard). Drop each dumpling into a pot of salted, boiling water and simmer for 15 minutes. If you plan on using your kreplach in soup, transfer immediately to hot chicken broth. To crisp them, transfer to a strainer after boiling for 30 minutes and then place in a shallow, greased pan and bake at 350° for 30–45 minutes, until golden.

I hope that Molly will forgive me, for filling in the blank spaces of her recipe. This is a conversation with an ancestor who has moved on to a place, I hope, that is filled with dumplings, and with other such corporeal comforts. While the kreplach that live on in my kitchen are a version of the ones I can’t actually recall, I know a lineage binds me and Molly, a genetic tie of flour, water, and the perfect comfort of a Jewish dumpling.

Hannah Selinger’s IACP award-nominated work has appeared in the New York Times, Eater, the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, The Cut, Wine Enthusiast, and elsewhere.


Traditional Beef-Filled Kreplach for the High Holidays

Just in time for the High Holidays, a tried-and-true recipe for kreplach, the delicious meat-filled Jewish soup dumpling.

I have written before about my love for kreplach – Jewish cuisine’s triangular, meat-filled soup dumpling. A Jewish wonton, if you will. In those earlier posts, I proffered a recipe for kreplach filled with chicken – as opposed to the traditional beef – as a way of lightening up this dish, which is usually served as a first course, after all, and often followed by yet more beef.

I stand by that version of kreplach. It’s delicious and useful for folks who don’t eat red meat or, at least, don’t want to eat that much red meat. However, it is time for me to share a recipe for the real thing: a classic beef-filled kreplach, like the kind my grandmother made for the High Holidays and that the whole family looked forward to all year.

I tinkered with this recipe for weeks in preparation for a High Holidays cooking class I was teaching at the Chicago Botanic Garden. I tried three different recipes for the pasta dough. I experimented with multiple ways to prepare the beef filling. In the end, I finally came up with a version that satisfied my taste memory of Grandma’s kreplach yet was still accessible and straightforward enough for most home cooks. Plus, I streamlined the process with the help of some trusty kitchen appliances.

There is no denying that making kreplach is a production. But since it is well-nigh impossible to buy kreplach, even for ready money, and they are beloved by just about everyone, it is well worth it to go through the process once a year.

I highly recommend preparing the filling the day before you plan to make the kreplach to break the work up into more manageable chunks. You can also freeze uncooked kreplach, so you can make them in advance, which is helpful when you are also preparing many other dishes for a holiday meal.

Perfecting the pasta dough for the dumplings took me three tries, as I mentioned. My usual all-egg pasta dough was very yellow in color and too rich – not how I remember Grandma’s dumplings at all. But when I tried a version with no eggs – just flour and water – the dough lacked structure. I settled on a version very similar to the recipe in Arthur Schwartz’s classic book Jewish Home Cooking that uses both eggs and water to hydrate the flour.

As for the meat filling, when I was researching kreplach recipes, I saw many that called for ground beef. That didn’t seem right to me at all. I remembered shreds of beef in my grandmother’s kreplach. So I gravitated towards recipes that called for cuts of beef – usually beef chuck, which is inexpensive but has a lot of flavor – to be simmered in liquid until fork-tender and then shredded.

As it turned out, that method of simmering the beef on the stove gave me the taste and texture I was looking for and it wasn’t an intimidating amount of work. While admittedly, it takes a long time to cook the meat until it is tender enough to shred, most of that time is passive, so you can go about your business while the meat simmers away.

Once you have dough and filling, the next step is to fill the dumplings. First, you have to roll out your pasta dough. It used to be a point of pride for Jewish housewives to roll their dough as thin as possible without tearing it. But if you have a pasta roller – either the kind that clamps onto the side of the counter or, better yet, a pasta roller attachment for your stand mixer – this step is a piece of cake. You can, of course, use a rolling pin, but it takes longer and it never gets as thin as with a pasta machine.

The trick with the filling, I learned, is to drain as much liquid from it as possible. A wet filling will make your pasta dough soggy. (Don’t discard the liquid the meat was cooked in though – once the fat is removed, it becomes a richly flavored beef broth.) Do not be tempted to overfill your dumplings either. A teaspoon of filling is plenty.

Having made kreplach several times over the last few weeks, I am very confident in this recipe and also in the worthiness of this somewhat time-consuming kitchen project. It will challenge you, especially if you do not make fresh pasta often – or ever – but stick with it.

Even if your first attempts at kreplach come out looking funny, as they might, they will still taste delicious and your friends and family will still gobble them up. And if you decide that making kreplach should be an annual tradition, you’ll eventually get the technique down, like a real balaboosta.


To Make Filling

Saute the onion with the ground meat. Remove excess fat.

Combine with the egg and salt and pepper to taste.

To Make Dough

Beat the eggs slightly. Add salt, water, and enough flour to make a medium-soft dough. Knead well by hand or in the food processor. Divide the dough into 2 balls. Cover with a moist towel.

Working quickly, roll out 1 ball of dough very thin with a rolling pin and cut into 6 strips, each 1-1/2 inches wide. Then cut into pieces 1-1/2 inches square.

Place 1/2 teaspoon meat mixture on each square. Fold into a triangle and press edges together firmly, using flour to bind. Leave as is, or press together two of the ends. Repeat with the second ball of dough.


Kreplach Soup ?

Kreplach soup is a traditional Jewish holiday soup. Kreplach are homemade noodle dumplings filled with ground meat (you can use skimmed one or substitute), mashed potatoes or other fillings served in a bowl of hot chicken broth. It is an adapted version of recipe of homemade popular holiday tradition when the whole family produces kreplach – each and one takes absolutely different forms – triangular, round, oval – variety of them. Generally the form of dough doesn’t matter. Process – that is what definitely makes these holidays dishes really one of the best occasions. The soup is quite fatty cause you include chopped meat (you need to fry it) and any refrigerated grocery, onions or minced vegetable or walnuts can fix it. Frying meat requires oil. It is good fat without dairy and flour.

Follow the instructions stepbystep during the preparing and filling and your effort will be for something with really delicious taste and one of the dishes totally worth eating.

Traditionally you can eat kreplach without water, they are served just boiled. But in our case you can add fresh broth and get the good soup with flavor of herbs.

Making kreplach soup from scratch is not an easy matter. It is truly a labor of love. That is why this delicious soup is reserved for special occasions.

This is the recipe for a basic minced chicken meat stuffed kreplach that are then served in the broth that is made while boiling our chicken for the filling.

The process of making kreplach is pretty time consuming and can get messy, but absolutely worth it in the end.

First the stock is made by boiling the whole chicken with vegetables like carrots, celery and herbs and spices like dill, parsley, cloves, and peppercorns. Boil for about 90 minutes. Then make the dough by whisking together eggs and oil and mixing them with the flour. Let it rest for about 20 minutes then roll the dough out until very thin and almost translucent. Make stuffing by combining shredded boiled chicken, caramelized, sautéed onions, fresh dill and a little bit reserved skimmed fatty liquid from the broth. You can also add chicken skin for a silkier texture and powerful flavor. Pulse all the ingredients in a food processor for a few times until blended but still chunky.

There is a few different ways to cut and fold Kreplach. You can make them triangle, half moon or three corner, whichever you prefer. I prefer cutting the dough in circles with cookie cutter, place a heaping teaspoon of filling into the center of each circle then wet finger and run it around the edge of the circle and fold it in half creating a half moon shape. You will probably end up with about 40-50 kreplach. You can boil them in water or same chicken stock. The dumplings will soak in some of the broth which will make them extra flavorful and very tasty. Serve Your handmade Dumplings in a chicken broth with fresh dill and chopped up carrots from the soup.

Ingredients

    3 large eggs 5 tbsp corn oil, divided 1 1/2-2 cups flour 3-4 lbs whole chicken 5 carrots, peeled and cut 5 celery stalks, cut Handful fresh parsley 1/2 tbsp black peppercorns 1/2 tbsp whole cloves 2 bay leaves 1 bunch fresh dill 1 onion, diced Salt and pepper

Steps

Make broth and chicken for the filling by boiling whole chicken, herbs and vegetables for about 90 minutes, skimming the foam and particles that rise. Replenish the liquid that was removed by skimming with hot water.

Heat 2 tbsp of corn oil in a skillet over medium heat. Place the diced onion into the skillet. Let it fry for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, till the onion turns golden brown. Remove from heat. Reserve the onions and oil in the skillet

After 90 minutes of cooking, when the chicken is tender, turn off the heat. Use a pair of tongs to carefully pull the chicken from the broth. Put it on a plate. Taste the chicken broth and season with additional salt and pepper, if desired. Allow the chicken and the broth to cool. Shred the chicken meat and carefully strain the broth into another pot through a mesh strainer. Reserve the vegetables, discard the spices and herbs. Skim the fat from the top of the broth and pour it into a bowl. Reserve the fatty liquid

Meanwhile, make your kreplach dough. Beat 3 eggs and 3 tbsp of the corn oil in a small bowl till frothy. Sift 1 1/2 cups of flour with 1 1/4 tsp of salt into your mixing bowl. In your mixing bowl, make a well in the center of the sifted flour and pour the beaten eggs in. Use a fork to mix the eggs into the flour until it is evenly moistened. Sift more flour into the bowl, a tablespoon at a time, and continue to stir until a soft dough forms. When the dough gets too thick to stir, use your hands to knead. Stop adding flour when the dough holds together and is only slightly sticky to the touch (it will be soft). Let it rest uncovered for 20 minutes.

Make your kreplach stuffing by chopping up and measuring out 1 1/2 cups of the boiled chicken pieces. Place the chopped chicken in a food processor. Add the fried onion with its oil, 3 tbsp of the chopped dill, and 2 tbsp of the reserved fatty liquid from the broth to the food processor. You can also throw in some of the fatty chicken skin for a more silky filling texture. Pulse the chicken mixture in the food processor till it becomes a chunky paste. Make sure to not overprices it. You will only need to pulse a couple of times.

Roll the dough out with lightly floured rolling pin to the desired thickness. Cut the dough into circles or squares. Place the stuffing in the middle and fold to the desired shape. Seal the kreplach by pinching the seal gently with your fingers.

Boil the assembled kreplach dumplings in water or chicken broth for about 10-15 minutes. Chop cooked, reserved carrots and add to the broth. Serve kreplach in chicken broth with fresh dill. Enjoy.


Best Kreplach Recipes - Recipes

Makes 2 to 3 dozen dumplings

This recipe was adapted from Canadian caterer and cookbook author Pam Reiss, who based them on a family recipe. The recipe doubles and triples easily.

2 tablespoons vegetable oil or rendered chicken fat

1 small yellow onion, peeled and diced

1 small red potato, peeled and cut into chunks

8 ounces cooked chicken (white and dark meat), or other leftover meats

1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Up to 1/4 cup chicken broth (if needed)

To make dough: Add the flour, salt and baking powder to the bowl of a food processor or mixer, and blend until well-mixed. With the mixer or processor going, drizzle in the oil and water, and mix until smooth. Check the consistency -- it should be very soft and smooth, but not too tacky. Add more water or flour if needed to achieve this consistency. Place the dough in a covered container so it doesn't dry out, and allow it to relax at room temperature for at least 1 hour.

To make filling: Heat the oil (or chicken fat) in a heavy pan over a medium heat. Add the onion and cook until well-caramelized (aka just this side of burnt). This will take about 30 minutes. Turn the heat down if they're cooking too quickly.

While the onions are cooking, toss the potato chunks into a small pot and cover with water. Bring to a boil, and simmer until tender. Drain and set aside.

Place the caramelized onion, boiled potato and chicken in a food processor or meat grinder with a large-holed attachment. Process until everything is broken down into a rough purée. Mash the ground chicken and potatoes and onions together with your hands or a wooden spoon, seasoning to taste with the salt and pepper. Add broth if needed for moistness -- you want a consistency like a moist, spreadable pâté. Too much moisture will cause the filling to sog through the dough, so don't overdo it.

To assemble and cook kreplach, roll relaxed dough 1/8 inch thick on a floured countertop. With a 2-inch round biscuit cutter (or drinking glass), cut out as many circles as you can. Pull up the remaining dough scraps, and again knead into a ball (it's best to do this step now, so that the dough has a chance to relax before being rolled again). With a tiny ice cream scoop, or two spoons, place a scant tablespoon of filling onto each dough circle.

To form, fold the dough around the filling to make a half-circle (you can stretch it a bit as needed to ease the dough over the filling), and press the edges firmly to seal. Take the two corners and bring them together, pressing them between your thumb and forefinger to seal them, creating a tortellini shape.

Place shaped dumpling on a well-floured baking sheet. Roll out remaining dough scraps, and repeat the process.

When the kreplach are all shaped, bring a pot of salted water to a boil. Throw in a dozen or so kreplach. They will sink to the bottom but then float to the top fairly quickly. Once they've all floated to the top, simmer for an additional minute. Remove with a slotted spoon, toss with a bit of vegetable oil, and spread on a baking sheet or plate. Repeat until all kreplach are cooked. If you'd like to freeze them for future use, place them in the freezer until par-frozen, then toss in a container or freezer bag for storage. If you'd like to eat them right away, simply add to hot soup and serve.


Neal’s Kreplach

My husband is not a cook. He will however, if asked, make a dish or meal without hesitation and often rather enthusiastically. What typically happens is he returns from a trip to the grocery store with a vast assortment of condiments and pickled products and, if we are lucky, the complete ingredients for whatever recipe he decided to tackle that day.

My husband is an attorney, he is not easily intimidated, thus time-consuming recipes or endless lists of ingredients are not a concern. He embraces a challenge and is fairly patient. He may need to work a bit on his timing however (the art of getting more than one dish on the table at once), but his overall effort and determination is impressive, especially for a non-cook. The result of all this can be fantastic, like his kreplach, or a fried Jewish dumpling.

Neal’s kreplach is not entirely traditional but he’s Jewish, so the love and history is there automatically. He did not grow up eating this and his recipe is not exactly healthy. But it is tasty. Our boys love his kreplach, and I am a big fan as well. Making this recipe fully from scratch takes a bit of commitment but the use of store-bought wonton wrappers reduces the time substantially. You can also assemble these in advance, refrigerate them, and cook them later–which is often what I do.

Traditionally, kreplach, is a type a small Jewish dumplings filled with ground meat, mashed potatoes or another filling. They are typically boiled and served in chicken soup, though they can also be fried. There are various ideas about the meaning of the word “kreplach.”

Some believe the name comes from the initials of three Jewish festivals: “K” for Kippur, “R” for Rabbi, and “P” for Purim, which together forms the word Krep. “Lach” comes from Yiddish, meaning “little”. Another suggestion is that the word comes from the German word “Krepp”, meaning “crepe”. Kreplach also caries with it a considerable amount of symbolism it’s triangular shape it said to represent Judaism’s three patriarchs: Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob.

Historically, kreplach is served during a number of Jewish holidays: (1) Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year (2) at the pre-fast meal before Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement and (3) on Purim, a Jewish holiday that commemorates the Jews being saved from Haman, who was planning to kill them.

A variety with a sweet cheese filling is sometimes served on Shavuot, a holiday that marks the giving of the Torah on Mt. Sinai. Fried kreplach (similar to what my husband makes) is popular on Chanukah (or Hanukkah as some say) commemorating the rededication of the Holy Temple in Jerusalem, because the kreplach are fried in oil, which references the oil in the miracle of Chanukah.

History aside, my husband’s kreplach is delicious mainly for it’s simplicity. There is a fried outer wrapper, and a simple seasoned meat filling. My family eats them as is. Depending on the filling, I have seen some top kreplach with sour cream or applesauce. But really nothing else is needed.


Potato and Cheese Kreplach

If I knew that the world was going to end or that it was my last day on earth, I would want potato-and-cheese kreplach with sour cream for dinner before I go.

For me, this simple, rustic, peasant dish is the ultimate.

I hadn’t had any for ages and ages and then, one day Ed and I were in Bratislava, Slovakia, perusing the menu at Houdini, a small restaurant conveniently located in our hotel.

They had potato-cheese pierogi!

There was no question about what I would order for dinner. I don’t even remember what else I could have chosen.

All I know is that the pierogies — the best I had ever eaten — came laden with sour cream and topped with chopped fresh chives.

I would go back to Bratislava just to have some more.

And I have been fantasizing about those things ever since.

However, because a trip to Slovakia is not in my immediate future, I decided to make some at home, but I made them kreplach shape in celebration of Purim, when it is customary to eat triangular shaped foods. These would be just perfect whether you make triangles or half moons.

If you’d like to make some, follow the recipe and look at the photos to see how the triangles are cut, filled and folded.

This is truly good food. Last day on earth worthy.

Potato Cheese Kreplach

FillinG:

3 large Yukon Gold potatoes (about one pound), peeled, cut into chunks (about 3 cups mashed potatoes)

salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Place the potato chunks in a large saucepan, cover with water and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to a simmer and cook for about 15 minutes or until the potatoes are tender. Drain the potatoes and spoon into a bowl. While the potatoes are cooking, heat the butter in a sauté pan over medium heat. When the butter has melted and looks foamy, add the onions and cook, stirring occasionally, for 12-15 minutes or until soft and golden brown. Add the onions to the potatoes. Add the farmer cheese, sprinkle with salt and pepper and mix the ingredients until well blended. Set aside to cool before filling the dough.

DougH:

3-1/2 cups all-purpose flour

1/4 cup butter, cut into chunks

2/3 cup water, approximately

Place the flour and salt in a large bowl. Add the butter and work it into the dough until the mixture is crumbly. Add 1/2 cup of the water and the sour cream and mix the dough until it is smooth, soft and well blended. If the dough seems too dry, add more water. (You can do this in a food processor.) Let the dough rest for at least 30 minutes. Using portions of the dough, roll the dough on a floured surface to 1/8-inch thick. Cut the dough into 3-3-1/2” squares. Place about one tablespoon of the filling onto each square. Slightly wet 2 sides of the square along the border. Fold the dough over the filling to make a triangle, pressing down onto the moist strips to seal the dough. Use the back of a fork to press the edges. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add the filled kreplach, 8-10 at a time, and simmer for about 15 minutes or until they are tender. Remove the kreplach with a slotted spoon and set aside repeat.


Cooks from all backgrounds

Seeing how the recipes are grouped into chapters, it seems that this book may not be intended for a Jewish audience at all. Rather, it is designed for interested cooks from a variety of backgrounds, who would buy this in the same way that they might buy a book of Indian or Caribbean recipes. For this audience, I expect it hits the spot quite nicely – a carefully chosen selection of brilliant, delicious recipes. It includes familiar Ashkenazi classics like chicken soup, latkes and challah. However the recipes also move into territory perhaps not traditionally associated with Jewish food. Examples in this latter category include Egyptian-Jewish stuffed aubergines, Greek-Jewish lamb fricassee, and Syrian cheese puffs.

This book may also be a good choice for a Jewish cook with limited experience, who might find TNCIJCB with its 1000 recipes somewhat overwhelming. Start with this, and graduate to the ‘big book’ later.

And if you’re looking for a beautiful cook book to give as a present to a foodie friend, this would be a terrific choice. My shelves are lined with umpteen gifted recipe books, and I think I can say with some authority that this ranks higher than many of them. It is niche, but not too niche, so any keen cook could find something in here that appealed to them.


Best Kreplach Recipes - Recipes

Makes 2 to 3 dozen dumplings

This recipe was adapted from Canadian caterer and cookbook author Pam Reiss, who based them on a family recipe. Reiss says her family store, Desserts Plus in Winnipeg, Manitoba, sells about 100 dozen kreplach during the Jewish holidays. The recipe doubles and triples easily, to fill your freezer with enough kreplach to last through the upcoming soup season.

2 tablespoons vegetable oil or rendered chicken fat

1 small yellow onion, peeled and diced

1 small red potato, peeled and cut into chunks

8 ounces cooked chicken (white and dark meat), or other leftover meats if you have them

1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Up to 1/4 cup chicken broth (if needed)

To make dough: Add the flour, salt and baking powder to the bowl of a food processor or mixer, and blend until well-mixed. With the mixer or processor going, drizzle in the oil and water, and mix until smooth. Check the consistency -- it should be very soft and smooth, but not too tacky. Add more water or flour if needed to achieve this consistency. Place the dough in a covered container so it doesn't dry out, and allow it to relax at room temperature for at least 1 hour.

To make filling: Heat the oil (or chicken fat) in a heavy pan over a medium heat. Add the onion and cook until well-caramelized (aka just this side of burnt). This will take about 30 minutes. Turn the heat down if they're cooking too quickly.

While the onions are cooking, toss the potato chunks into a small pot and cover with water. Bring to a boil, and simmer until tender. Drain and set aside.

Place the caramelized onion, boiled potato and chicken in a food processor or meat grinder with a large-holed attachment. Process until everything is broken down into a rough purée. Mash the ground chicken and potatoes and onions together with your hands or a wooden spoon, seasoning to taste with the salt and pepper. Add broth if needed for moistness -- you want a consistency like a moist, spreadable pâté. Too much moisture will cause the filling to sog through the dough, so don't overdo it.

To assemble and cook kreplach, roll relaxed dough 1/8 inch thick on a floured countertop. With a 2-inch round biscuit cutter (or drinking glass), cut out as many circles as you can. Pull up the remaining dough scraps, and again knead into a ball (it's best to do this step now, so that the dough has a chance to relax before being rolled again). With a tiny ice cream scoop, or two spoons, place a scant tablespoon of filling onto each dough circle.

To form, fold the dough around the filling to make a half-circle (you can stretch it a bit as needed to ease the dough over the filling), and press the edges firmly to seal. Take the two corners and bring them together, pressing them between your thumb and forefinger to seal them, creating a tortellini shape.

Place shaped dumpling on a well-floured baking sheet. Roll out remaining dough scraps, and repeat the process.

When the kreplach are all shaped, bring a pot of salted water to a boil. Throw in a dozen or so kreplach. They will sink to the bottom but then float to the top fairly quickly. Once they've all floated to the top, simmer for an additional minute. Remove with a slotted spoon, toss with a bit of vegetable oil, and spread on a baking sheet or plate. Repeat until all kreplach are cooked. If you'd like to freeze them for future use, place them in the freezer until par-frozen, then toss in a container or freezer bag for storage. If you'd like to eat them right away, simply add to hot soup and serve.


Kreplach recipe for Erev Yom Kippur

In addition to the mitzvah of fasting on the day of Yom Kippur, there is a mitzvah to eat on Erev [the eve of] Yom Kippur, and a festive meal called seduas hamafsekes is eaten in the late afternoon. A traditional menu for that meal consists of chicken — not too spicy so that one would not become thirsty later — and accompaniments. Chicken soup typically precedes the main course. Instead of matzoh balls or noods, the soup accompaniement for this occasion is kreplach — a type of wonton. Part of the reason for this custom is the similarity of name of the food: kreplach has the same letters as Kippur.

It is a bit of a patchken to make from scratch because you have to make a dough and roll it out, so if you are short on time, you can buy it ready or in frozen form. But homemade is usally best. Here’s the recipe I make.

Kreplach

Dough
1 lb. flour
1 extra large egg
8-12 oz. warm water

Filling
1 lb. ground beef
1 small onion diced small
salt and pepper to taste
2-3 tablespoons oil (if you fry) I now just put it straight in a Teflon pan

It makes sense to make the filling first, as you would want the meat to cool down before putting it in the dough. Also you can prepare it ahead and freeze it, allowing time to defrost before putting it in the dough.
Brown the onions and ground beef in a pan. You can do this with oil to fry, or eliminate some fat by putting it all straight into a coated pan.

Mix all the dough ingredients together. I do this in a Kitchen-Aid with the dough hook. Mix until the dought is smooth. Form a ball that you roll out as flat as you can. Cut out circles with a glass of the size you want to use.

Assemble the kreplach by placing one spoonful of the meat filling in the center of each circle and folding it over. Seal the edges. Bring a pot of salted water to boild. Drop in the kreplach. They are done when they float up to the top, which takes 4-5 minutes of cooking. Remove and place them into soup a short while before you’re ready to serve it.


Watch the video: Jamie Geller Building the Dream Home In Israel (September 2021).