Over Not-So Easy


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Oh, you can have eggs so many ways. Whether they’re scrambled or sunny side up, eggs are easy and delectable, and they are appropriate for eating any time of day. However, some styles of egg are a little more difficult to master and can cause some unwanted frustration in the kitchen. Over-easy and over-medium eggs are particularly tricky, especially when it comes to flipping them on the skillet. And most of the time, the flipping problem stems from a problem of commitment. It’s that last second of hesitation that will turn your gorgeous eggs into a broken, unsalvageable mess. But worry no more. Here are some basics steps that will hopefully prevent you from performing egg triage on a hot skillet.

1. Make sure your pan or skillet is thoroughly buttered and on medium heat. If the eggs stick to the skillet, game over. You failed and your eggs are done for.

Photo by Kathleen Lee

2. Carefully crack two eggs into the skillet and try to prevent the whites from overlapping. Cook for about 2 minutes.

Photo by Kathleen Lee

3. Don’t jump the gun. Make sure the egg whites have cooked thoroughly. You should barely be able to see raw egg whites around the yolk.

4. Gently slip the spatula under the whites and make sure the eggs slide on the skillet and aren’t sticking. Now you have to really commit.

Photo by Kathleen Lee

5. Gracefully slide the spatula under the egg, but do it fast. Make sure the egg is resting completely on the spatula. Without hesitation, as closely to the pan as possible, flip the egg in one fluid motion. Cook for about a minute.

6. And finally, carefully slide spatula under the eggs, slip onto some toast, and enjoy!

Photo by Kathleen Lee

The secret is to not over-think it. Just remember to take your time and let the eggs get just firm enough to flip. And when you flip them, believe in yourself.

Photo by Kathleen Lee

The post Over Not-So Easy originally appeared on Spoon University. Please visit Spoon University to see more posts like this one.


Over Not So Easy

A 62-year-old woman with end-stage liver disease was hospitalized for recurrent variceal bleeding. On admission, she reported allergies to a number of medications as well as a food allergy to eggs. The patient was adamant about appropriate documentation of her allergies, especially her food allergy because "scrambled eggs almost killed me." Consequently, her medication and food allergies were clearly displayed on her medical chart as well as her wristband.

On hospital day 1, she underwent successful banding of a bleeding varix. Post-procedure, she developed some mild hepatic encephalopathy and was treated with lactulose. She was slightly disoriented but alert, and her diet was advanced—the diet order at the time was "low-salt diet."

She remained clinically stable until the morning of hospital day 2, when she had acute onset of tachypnea with audible wheezing and hypoxia. She recovered quickly with administration of continuous albuterol, hydrocortisone, and antihistamines. At the time of the event, one of the clinicians noticed that her breakfast tray, sitting by her bedside, included a plate of half-eaten bacon and eggs. She did not recall eating the eggs, probably because of her encephalopathy. She had no long-lasting complications from the allergic reaction.


Over Not So Easy

A 62-year-old woman with end-stage liver disease was hospitalized for recurrent variceal bleeding. On admission, she reported allergies to a number of medications as well as a food allergy to eggs. The patient was adamant about appropriate documentation of her allergies, especially her food allergy because "scrambled eggs almost killed me." Consequently, her medication and food allergies were clearly displayed on her medical chart as well as her wristband.

On hospital day 1, she underwent successful banding of a bleeding varix. Post-procedure, she developed some mild hepatic encephalopathy and was treated with lactulose. She was slightly disoriented but alert, and her diet was advanced—the diet order at the time was "low-salt diet."

She remained clinically stable until the morning of hospital day 2, when she had acute onset of tachypnea with audible wheezing and hypoxia. She recovered quickly with administration of continuous albuterol, hydrocortisone, and antihistamines. At the time of the event, one of the clinicians noticed that her breakfast tray, sitting by her bedside, included a plate of half-eaten bacon and eggs. She did not recall eating the eggs, probably because of her encephalopathy. She had no long-lasting complications from the allergic reaction.


Over Not So Easy

A 62-year-old woman with end-stage liver disease was hospitalized for recurrent variceal bleeding. On admission, she reported allergies to a number of medications as well as a food allergy to eggs. The patient was adamant about appropriate documentation of her allergies, especially her food allergy because "scrambled eggs almost killed me." Consequently, her medication and food allergies were clearly displayed on her medical chart as well as her wristband.

On hospital day 1, she underwent successful banding of a bleeding varix. Post-procedure, she developed some mild hepatic encephalopathy and was treated with lactulose. She was slightly disoriented but alert, and her diet was advanced—the diet order at the time was "low-salt diet."

She remained clinically stable until the morning of hospital day 2, when she had acute onset of tachypnea with audible wheezing and hypoxia. She recovered quickly with administration of continuous albuterol, hydrocortisone, and antihistamines. At the time of the event, one of the clinicians noticed that her breakfast tray, sitting by her bedside, included a plate of half-eaten bacon and eggs. She did not recall eating the eggs, probably because of her encephalopathy. She had no long-lasting complications from the allergic reaction.


Over Not So Easy

A 62-year-old woman with end-stage liver disease was hospitalized for recurrent variceal bleeding. On admission, she reported allergies to a number of medications as well as a food allergy to eggs. The patient was adamant about appropriate documentation of her allergies, especially her food allergy because "scrambled eggs almost killed me." Consequently, her medication and food allergies were clearly displayed on her medical chart as well as her wristband.

On hospital day 1, she underwent successful banding of a bleeding varix. Post-procedure, she developed some mild hepatic encephalopathy and was treated with lactulose. She was slightly disoriented but alert, and her diet was advanced—the diet order at the time was "low-salt diet."

She remained clinically stable until the morning of hospital day 2, when she had acute onset of tachypnea with audible wheezing and hypoxia. She recovered quickly with administration of continuous albuterol, hydrocortisone, and antihistamines. At the time of the event, one of the clinicians noticed that her breakfast tray, sitting by her bedside, included a plate of half-eaten bacon and eggs. She did not recall eating the eggs, probably because of her encephalopathy. She had no long-lasting complications from the allergic reaction.


Over Not So Easy

A 62-year-old woman with end-stage liver disease was hospitalized for recurrent variceal bleeding. On admission, she reported allergies to a number of medications as well as a food allergy to eggs. The patient was adamant about appropriate documentation of her allergies, especially her food allergy because "scrambled eggs almost killed me." Consequently, her medication and food allergies were clearly displayed on her medical chart as well as her wristband.

On hospital day 1, she underwent successful banding of a bleeding varix. Post-procedure, she developed some mild hepatic encephalopathy and was treated with lactulose. She was slightly disoriented but alert, and her diet was advanced—the diet order at the time was "low-salt diet."

She remained clinically stable until the morning of hospital day 2, when she had acute onset of tachypnea with audible wheezing and hypoxia. She recovered quickly with administration of continuous albuterol, hydrocortisone, and antihistamines. At the time of the event, one of the clinicians noticed that her breakfast tray, sitting by her bedside, included a plate of half-eaten bacon and eggs. She did not recall eating the eggs, probably because of her encephalopathy. She had no long-lasting complications from the allergic reaction.


Over Not So Easy

A 62-year-old woman with end-stage liver disease was hospitalized for recurrent variceal bleeding. On admission, she reported allergies to a number of medications as well as a food allergy to eggs. The patient was adamant about appropriate documentation of her allergies, especially her food allergy because "scrambled eggs almost killed me." Consequently, her medication and food allergies were clearly displayed on her medical chart as well as her wristband.

On hospital day 1, she underwent successful banding of a bleeding varix. Post-procedure, she developed some mild hepatic encephalopathy and was treated with lactulose. She was slightly disoriented but alert, and her diet was advanced—the diet order at the time was "low-salt diet."

She remained clinically stable until the morning of hospital day 2, when she had acute onset of tachypnea with audible wheezing and hypoxia. She recovered quickly with administration of continuous albuterol, hydrocortisone, and antihistamines. At the time of the event, one of the clinicians noticed that her breakfast tray, sitting by her bedside, included a plate of half-eaten bacon and eggs. She did not recall eating the eggs, probably because of her encephalopathy. She had no long-lasting complications from the allergic reaction.


Over Not So Easy

A 62-year-old woman with end-stage liver disease was hospitalized for recurrent variceal bleeding. On admission, she reported allergies to a number of medications as well as a food allergy to eggs. The patient was adamant about appropriate documentation of her allergies, especially her food allergy because "scrambled eggs almost killed me." Consequently, her medication and food allergies were clearly displayed on her medical chart as well as her wristband.

On hospital day 1, she underwent successful banding of a bleeding varix. Post-procedure, she developed some mild hepatic encephalopathy and was treated with lactulose. She was slightly disoriented but alert, and her diet was advanced—the diet order at the time was "low-salt diet."

She remained clinically stable until the morning of hospital day 2, when she had acute onset of tachypnea with audible wheezing and hypoxia. She recovered quickly with administration of continuous albuterol, hydrocortisone, and antihistamines. At the time of the event, one of the clinicians noticed that her breakfast tray, sitting by her bedside, included a plate of half-eaten bacon and eggs. She did not recall eating the eggs, probably because of her encephalopathy. She had no long-lasting complications from the allergic reaction.


Over Not So Easy

A 62-year-old woman with end-stage liver disease was hospitalized for recurrent variceal bleeding. On admission, she reported allergies to a number of medications as well as a food allergy to eggs. The patient was adamant about appropriate documentation of her allergies, especially her food allergy because "scrambled eggs almost killed me." Consequently, her medication and food allergies were clearly displayed on her medical chart as well as her wristband.

On hospital day 1, she underwent successful banding of a bleeding varix. Post-procedure, she developed some mild hepatic encephalopathy and was treated with lactulose. She was slightly disoriented but alert, and her diet was advanced—the diet order at the time was "low-salt diet."

She remained clinically stable until the morning of hospital day 2, when she had acute onset of tachypnea with audible wheezing and hypoxia. She recovered quickly with administration of continuous albuterol, hydrocortisone, and antihistamines. At the time of the event, one of the clinicians noticed that her breakfast tray, sitting by her bedside, included a plate of half-eaten bacon and eggs. She did not recall eating the eggs, probably because of her encephalopathy. She had no long-lasting complications from the allergic reaction.


Over Not So Easy

A 62-year-old woman with end-stage liver disease was hospitalized for recurrent variceal bleeding. On admission, she reported allergies to a number of medications as well as a food allergy to eggs. The patient was adamant about appropriate documentation of her allergies, especially her food allergy because "scrambled eggs almost killed me." Consequently, her medication and food allergies were clearly displayed on her medical chart as well as her wristband.

On hospital day 1, she underwent successful banding of a bleeding varix. Post-procedure, she developed some mild hepatic encephalopathy and was treated with lactulose. She was slightly disoriented but alert, and her diet was advanced—the diet order at the time was "low-salt diet."

She remained clinically stable until the morning of hospital day 2, when she had acute onset of tachypnea with audible wheezing and hypoxia. She recovered quickly with administration of continuous albuterol, hydrocortisone, and antihistamines. At the time of the event, one of the clinicians noticed that her breakfast tray, sitting by her bedside, included a plate of half-eaten bacon and eggs. She did not recall eating the eggs, probably because of her encephalopathy. She had no long-lasting complications from the allergic reaction.


Over Not So Easy

A 62-year-old woman with end-stage liver disease was hospitalized for recurrent variceal bleeding. On admission, she reported allergies to a number of medications as well as a food allergy to eggs. The patient was adamant about appropriate documentation of her allergies, especially her food allergy because "scrambled eggs almost killed me." Consequently, her medication and food allergies were clearly displayed on her medical chart as well as her wristband.

On hospital day 1, she underwent successful banding of a bleeding varix. Post-procedure, she developed some mild hepatic encephalopathy and was treated with lactulose. She was slightly disoriented but alert, and her diet was advanced—the diet order at the time was "low-salt diet."

She remained clinically stable until the morning of hospital day 2, when she had acute onset of tachypnea with audible wheezing and hypoxia. She recovered quickly with administration of continuous albuterol, hydrocortisone, and antihistamines. At the time of the event, one of the clinicians noticed that her breakfast tray, sitting by her bedside, included a plate of half-eaten bacon and eggs. She did not recall eating the eggs, probably because of her encephalopathy. She had no long-lasting complications from the allergic reaction.


Watch the video: Not So Easy by Lina Ng (May 2022).