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10 Most Followed Food Critics on Twitter

10 Most Followed Food Critics on Twitter

Food critics may prize anonymity when it comes to staying undercover while eating in restaurants, but when it comes to social media they're a lot less shy. No strangers to sharing opinions, these writers are fully equipt to deliver short, pithy commentary in 140 characters or less.

Like many popular chefs, quite a few critics have tried boosting their online profiles. Twitter serves as the perfect medium for communicating with an audience of Yelping, Chow-obsessed food lovers.

But who are the most followed critics on Twitter? For the purposes of this list we looked at active food critics, which includes individuals whose current job includes reviewing restaurants (sorry, Frank Bruni). Think of this as your ultimate guide to industry hotshots.

Correction: As Alison Cook of the Houston Chronicle was kind enough to tweet (@alisoncook), her 6,434 followers at the publication of this correction (May 5, 2011) puts her in play on this list of most followed critics on Twitter. An updated list follows.

#11 Robert Sietsema: 5,339 followers (previously 5,069)
#10 Brett Anderson: 5,688 followers (previously 5,404)
#9 Alison Cook: 6,434 followers
#8 Corby Kummer: 6,525 followers (previously 6,130)
#7 Adam Platt: 6,584 followers (previously 6,227)
#6 Jeffrey Steingarten: 7,677 followers (previously 7,304)
#5 Michael Bauer: 11,855 followers (previously 11,382)
#4 Tom Sietsema: 12,828 followers (previously 12,257)
#3 Jonathan Gold: 19,557 followers (previously 18,850)
#2 Sam Sifton: 60,027 followers (previously 56,136)
#1 Gael Greene: 72,237 followers (previously 69,230)


The Epicurious Blog

My wife and I play a game when we go out to eat: Name the cliché that food writers would use to describe the place. If the restaurant has a fireplace and it&aposs crowded: It&aposs cozy. If we have the chocolate cake, we know it will be described as decadent by a critic soon. Here are our top five most annoying food-writing clichés. But I&aposm also curious what readers think. Does your local food scribe make you cringe? How so? Please add your own clunkers in the comments field.

Decadent dessert
For some reason this is hard-wired into emerging food writers&apos brains. If it&aposs a dessert, and not tart or fruity, it must be decadent right? Wrong. Maybe it&aposs sweet. Or made of chocolate. But what does decadent really mean? And how many non-decadent chocolate cakes have you had?

Cozy interior
What does this really tell you about a place? Answer: Nothing on its own. Better to say what you see, feel, hear, smell, taste. Chances are the writer is trying to avoid saying that the place is small, crowded, cramped, has low ceilings, employs candles, or seems old-fashioned. Charming tends to fall into the same rut.

Yummy
I frequently want to use the word "yummy" or even "yum" and "yummo" (sorry) when I have had a particularly pleasing dish. But what does yummy say? Delicious in a cute way? Avoid at all costs specially when paired with fries (as in "yummy french fries").

Wash it down with.
Technically, we do wash down our food with drinks. But the phrase is overused and evokes plumbing more than good eating. When you read these words, you are witnessing a clunky segue from food description to beverages. It&aposs typically a last sentence in a short review and often just a reiteration of what&aposs on the cocktail or wine list.

Save room for.
Imagine a grandma wagging her finger at you: Save room for dessert! Don&apost fill the belly! I can&apost believe you ate the whole thing. Ack! It&aposs like an attack of the cuteness monster. Get it away from me!


The Epicurious Blog

My wife and I play a game when we go out to eat: Name the cliché that food writers would use to describe the place. If the restaurant has a fireplace and it&aposs crowded: It&aposs cozy. If we have the chocolate cake, we know it will be described as decadent by a critic soon. Here are our top five most annoying food-writing clichés. But I&aposm also curious what readers think. Does your local food scribe make you cringe? How so? Please add your own clunkers in the comments field.

Decadent dessert
For some reason this is hard-wired into emerging food writers&apos brains. If it&aposs a dessert, and not tart or fruity, it must be decadent right? Wrong. Maybe it&aposs sweet. Or made of chocolate. But what does decadent really mean? And how many non-decadent chocolate cakes have you had?

Cozy interior
What does this really tell you about a place? Answer: Nothing on its own. Better to say what you see, feel, hear, smell, taste. Chances are the writer is trying to avoid saying that the place is small, crowded, cramped, has low ceilings, employs candles, or seems old-fashioned. Charming tends to fall into the same rut.

Yummy
I frequently want to use the word "yummy" or even "yum" and "yummo" (sorry) when I have had a particularly pleasing dish. But what does yummy say? Delicious in a cute way? Avoid at all costs specially when paired with fries (as in "yummy french fries").

Wash it down with.
Technically, we do wash down our food with drinks. But the phrase is overused and evokes plumbing more than good eating. When you read these words, you are witnessing a clunky segue from food description to beverages. It&aposs typically a last sentence in a short review and often just a reiteration of what&aposs on the cocktail or wine list.

Save room for.
Imagine a grandma wagging her finger at you: Save room for dessert! Don&apost fill the belly! I can&apost believe you ate the whole thing. Ack! It&aposs like an attack of the cuteness monster. Get it away from me!


The Epicurious Blog

My wife and I play a game when we go out to eat: Name the cliché that food writers would use to describe the place. If the restaurant has a fireplace and it&aposs crowded: It&aposs cozy. If we have the chocolate cake, we know it will be described as decadent by a critic soon. Here are our top five most annoying food-writing clichés. But I&aposm also curious what readers think. Does your local food scribe make you cringe? How so? Please add your own clunkers in the comments field.

Decadent dessert
For some reason this is hard-wired into emerging food writers&apos brains. If it&aposs a dessert, and not tart or fruity, it must be decadent right? Wrong. Maybe it&aposs sweet. Or made of chocolate. But what does decadent really mean? And how many non-decadent chocolate cakes have you had?

Cozy interior
What does this really tell you about a place? Answer: Nothing on its own. Better to say what you see, feel, hear, smell, taste. Chances are the writer is trying to avoid saying that the place is small, crowded, cramped, has low ceilings, employs candles, or seems old-fashioned. Charming tends to fall into the same rut.

Yummy
I frequently want to use the word "yummy" or even "yum" and "yummo" (sorry) when I have had a particularly pleasing dish. But what does yummy say? Delicious in a cute way? Avoid at all costs specially when paired with fries (as in "yummy french fries").

Wash it down with.
Technically, we do wash down our food with drinks. But the phrase is overused and evokes plumbing more than good eating. When you read these words, you are witnessing a clunky segue from food description to beverages. It&aposs typically a last sentence in a short review and often just a reiteration of what&aposs on the cocktail or wine list.

Save room for.
Imagine a grandma wagging her finger at you: Save room for dessert! Don&apost fill the belly! I can&apost believe you ate the whole thing. Ack! It&aposs like an attack of the cuteness monster. Get it away from me!


The Epicurious Blog

My wife and I play a game when we go out to eat: Name the cliché that food writers would use to describe the place. If the restaurant has a fireplace and it&aposs crowded: It&aposs cozy. If we have the chocolate cake, we know it will be described as decadent by a critic soon. Here are our top five most annoying food-writing clichés. But I&aposm also curious what readers think. Does your local food scribe make you cringe? How so? Please add your own clunkers in the comments field.

Decadent dessert
For some reason this is hard-wired into emerging food writers&apos brains. If it&aposs a dessert, and not tart or fruity, it must be decadent right? Wrong. Maybe it&aposs sweet. Or made of chocolate. But what does decadent really mean? And how many non-decadent chocolate cakes have you had?

Cozy interior
What does this really tell you about a place? Answer: Nothing on its own. Better to say what you see, feel, hear, smell, taste. Chances are the writer is trying to avoid saying that the place is small, crowded, cramped, has low ceilings, employs candles, or seems old-fashioned. Charming tends to fall into the same rut.

Yummy
I frequently want to use the word "yummy" or even "yum" and "yummo" (sorry) when I have had a particularly pleasing dish. But what does yummy say? Delicious in a cute way? Avoid at all costs specially when paired with fries (as in "yummy french fries").

Wash it down with.
Technically, we do wash down our food with drinks. But the phrase is overused and evokes plumbing more than good eating. When you read these words, you are witnessing a clunky segue from food description to beverages. It&aposs typically a last sentence in a short review and often just a reiteration of what&aposs on the cocktail or wine list.

Save room for.
Imagine a grandma wagging her finger at you: Save room for dessert! Don&apost fill the belly! I can&apost believe you ate the whole thing. Ack! It&aposs like an attack of the cuteness monster. Get it away from me!


The Epicurious Blog

My wife and I play a game when we go out to eat: Name the cliché that food writers would use to describe the place. If the restaurant has a fireplace and it&aposs crowded: It&aposs cozy. If we have the chocolate cake, we know it will be described as decadent by a critic soon. Here are our top five most annoying food-writing clichés. But I&aposm also curious what readers think. Does your local food scribe make you cringe? How so? Please add your own clunkers in the comments field.

Decadent dessert
For some reason this is hard-wired into emerging food writers&apos brains. If it&aposs a dessert, and not tart or fruity, it must be decadent right? Wrong. Maybe it&aposs sweet. Or made of chocolate. But what does decadent really mean? And how many non-decadent chocolate cakes have you had?

Cozy interior
What does this really tell you about a place? Answer: Nothing on its own. Better to say what you see, feel, hear, smell, taste. Chances are the writer is trying to avoid saying that the place is small, crowded, cramped, has low ceilings, employs candles, or seems old-fashioned. Charming tends to fall into the same rut.

Yummy
I frequently want to use the word "yummy" or even "yum" and "yummo" (sorry) when I have had a particularly pleasing dish. But what does yummy say? Delicious in a cute way? Avoid at all costs specially when paired with fries (as in "yummy french fries").

Wash it down with.
Technically, we do wash down our food with drinks. But the phrase is overused and evokes plumbing more than good eating. When you read these words, you are witnessing a clunky segue from food description to beverages. It&aposs typically a last sentence in a short review and often just a reiteration of what&aposs on the cocktail or wine list.

Save room for.
Imagine a grandma wagging her finger at you: Save room for dessert! Don&apost fill the belly! I can&apost believe you ate the whole thing. Ack! It&aposs like an attack of the cuteness monster. Get it away from me!


The Epicurious Blog

My wife and I play a game when we go out to eat: Name the cliché that food writers would use to describe the place. If the restaurant has a fireplace and it&aposs crowded: It&aposs cozy. If we have the chocolate cake, we know it will be described as decadent by a critic soon. Here are our top five most annoying food-writing clichés. But I&aposm also curious what readers think. Does your local food scribe make you cringe? How so? Please add your own clunkers in the comments field.

Decadent dessert
For some reason this is hard-wired into emerging food writers&apos brains. If it&aposs a dessert, and not tart or fruity, it must be decadent right? Wrong. Maybe it&aposs sweet. Or made of chocolate. But what does decadent really mean? And how many non-decadent chocolate cakes have you had?

Cozy interior
What does this really tell you about a place? Answer: Nothing on its own. Better to say what you see, feel, hear, smell, taste. Chances are the writer is trying to avoid saying that the place is small, crowded, cramped, has low ceilings, employs candles, or seems old-fashioned. Charming tends to fall into the same rut.

Yummy
I frequently want to use the word "yummy" or even "yum" and "yummo" (sorry) when I have had a particularly pleasing dish. But what does yummy say? Delicious in a cute way? Avoid at all costs specially when paired with fries (as in "yummy french fries").

Wash it down with.
Technically, we do wash down our food with drinks. But the phrase is overused and evokes plumbing more than good eating. When you read these words, you are witnessing a clunky segue from food description to beverages. It&aposs typically a last sentence in a short review and often just a reiteration of what&aposs on the cocktail or wine list.

Save room for.
Imagine a grandma wagging her finger at you: Save room for dessert! Don&apost fill the belly! I can&apost believe you ate the whole thing. Ack! It&aposs like an attack of the cuteness monster. Get it away from me!


The Epicurious Blog

My wife and I play a game when we go out to eat: Name the cliché that food writers would use to describe the place. If the restaurant has a fireplace and it&aposs crowded: It&aposs cozy. If we have the chocolate cake, we know it will be described as decadent by a critic soon. Here are our top five most annoying food-writing clichés. But I&aposm also curious what readers think. Does your local food scribe make you cringe? How so? Please add your own clunkers in the comments field.

Decadent dessert
For some reason this is hard-wired into emerging food writers&apos brains. If it&aposs a dessert, and not tart or fruity, it must be decadent right? Wrong. Maybe it&aposs sweet. Or made of chocolate. But what does decadent really mean? And how many non-decadent chocolate cakes have you had?

Cozy interior
What does this really tell you about a place? Answer: Nothing on its own. Better to say what you see, feel, hear, smell, taste. Chances are the writer is trying to avoid saying that the place is small, crowded, cramped, has low ceilings, employs candles, or seems old-fashioned. Charming tends to fall into the same rut.

Yummy
I frequently want to use the word "yummy" or even "yum" and "yummo" (sorry) when I have had a particularly pleasing dish. But what does yummy say? Delicious in a cute way? Avoid at all costs specially when paired with fries (as in "yummy french fries").

Wash it down with.
Technically, we do wash down our food with drinks. But the phrase is overused and evokes plumbing more than good eating. When you read these words, you are witnessing a clunky segue from food description to beverages. It&aposs typically a last sentence in a short review and often just a reiteration of what&aposs on the cocktail or wine list.

Save room for.
Imagine a grandma wagging her finger at you: Save room for dessert! Don&apost fill the belly! I can&apost believe you ate the whole thing. Ack! It&aposs like an attack of the cuteness monster. Get it away from me!


The Epicurious Blog

My wife and I play a game when we go out to eat: Name the cliché that food writers would use to describe the place. If the restaurant has a fireplace and it&aposs crowded: It&aposs cozy. If we have the chocolate cake, we know it will be described as decadent by a critic soon. Here are our top five most annoying food-writing clichés. But I&aposm also curious what readers think. Does your local food scribe make you cringe? How so? Please add your own clunkers in the comments field.

Decadent dessert
For some reason this is hard-wired into emerging food writers&apos brains. If it&aposs a dessert, and not tart or fruity, it must be decadent right? Wrong. Maybe it&aposs sweet. Or made of chocolate. But what does decadent really mean? And how many non-decadent chocolate cakes have you had?

Cozy interior
What does this really tell you about a place? Answer: Nothing on its own. Better to say what you see, feel, hear, smell, taste. Chances are the writer is trying to avoid saying that the place is small, crowded, cramped, has low ceilings, employs candles, or seems old-fashioned. Charming tends to fall into the same rut.

Yummy
I frequently want to use the word "yummy" or even "yum" and "yummo" (sorry) when I have had a particularly pleasing dish. But what does yummy say? Delicious in a cute way? Avoid at all costs specially when paired with fries (as in "yummy french fries").

Wash it down with.
Technically, we do wash down our food with drinks. But the phrase is overused and evokes plumbing more than good eating. When you read these words, you are witnessing a clunky segue from food description to beverages. It&aposs typically a last sentence in a short review and often just a reiteration of what&aposs on the cocktail or wine list.

Save room for.
Imagine a grandma wagging her finger at you: Save room for dessert! Don&apost fill the belly! I can&apost believe you ate the whole thing. Ack! It&aposs like an attack of the cuteness monster. Get it away from me!


The Epicurious Blog

My wife and I play a game when we go out to eat: Name the cliché that food writers would use to describe the place. If the restaurant has a fireplace and it&aposs crowded: It&aposs cozy. If we have the chocolate cake, we know it will be described as decadent by a critic soon. Here are our top five most annoying food-writing clichés. But I&aposm also curious what readers think. Does your local food scribe make you cringe? How so? Please add your own clunkers in the comments field.

Decadent dessert
For some reason this is hard-wired into emerging food writers&apos brains. If it&aposs a dessert, and not tart or fruity, it must be decadent right? Wrong. Maybe it&aposs sweet. Or made of chocolate. But what does decadent really mean? And how many non-decadent chocolate cakes have you had?

Cozy interior
What does this really tell you about a place? Answer: Nothing on its own. Better to say what you see, feel, hear, smell, taste. Chances are the writer is trying to avoid saying that the place is small, crowded, cramped, has low ceilings, employs candles, or seems old-fashioned. Charming tends to fall into the same rut.

Yummy
I frequently want to use the word "yummy" or even "yum" and "yummo" (sorry) when I have had a particularly pleasing dish. But what does yummy say? Delicious in a cute way? Avoid at all costs specially when paired with fries (as in "yummy french fries").

Wash it down with.
Technically, we do wash down our food with drinks. But the phrase is overused and evokes plumbing more than good eating. When you read these words, you are witnessing a clunky segue from food description to beverages. It&aposs typically a last sentence in a short review and often just a reiteration of what&aposs on the cocktail or wine list.

Save room for.
Imagine a grandma wagging her finger at you: Save room for dessert! Don&apost fill the belly! I can&apost believe you ate the whole thing. Ack! It&aposs like an attack of the cuteness monster. Get it away from me!


The Epicurious Blog

My wife and I play a game when we go out to eat: Name the cliché that food writers would use to describe the place. If the restaurant has a fireplace and it&aposs crowded: It&aposs cozy. If we have the chocolate cake, we know it will be described as decadent by a critic soon. Here are our top five most annoying food-writing clichés. But I&aposm also curious what readers think. Does your local food scribe make you cringe? How so? Please add your own clunkers in the comments field.

Decadent dessert
For some reason this is hard-wired into emerging food writers&apos brains. If it&aposs a dessert, and not tart or fruity, it must be decadent right? Wrong. Maybe it&aposs sweet. Or made of chocolate. But what does decadent really mean? And how many non-decadent chocolate cakes have you had?

Cozy interior
What does this really tell you about a place? Answer: Nothing on its own. Better to say what you see, feel, hear, smell, taste. Chances are the writer is trying to avoid saying that the place is small, crowded, cramped, has low ceilings, employs candles, or seems old-fashioned. Charming tends to fall into the same rut.

Yummy
I frequently want to use the word "yummy" or even "yum" and "yummo" (sorry) when I have had a particularly pleasing dish. But what does yummy say? Delicious in a cute way? Avoid at all costs specially when paired with fries (as in "yummy french fries").

Wash it down with.
Technically, we do wash down our food with drinks. But the phrase is overused and evokes plumbing more than good eating. When you read these words, you are witnessing a clunky segue from food description to beverages. It&aposs typically a last sentence in a short review and often just a reiteration of what&aposs on the cocktail or wine list.

Save room for.
Imagine a grandma wagging her finger at you: Save room for dessert! Don&apost fill the belly! I can&apost believe you ate the whole thing. Ack! It&aposs like an attack of the cuteness monster. Get it away from me!


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