Cocktail Recipes, Spirits, and Local Bars

Pro Cooking Techniques That Anyone Can Pull Off

Pro Cooking Techniques That Anyone Can Pull Off



We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

There are some people who can cook just about anything if they have the right cookbook on hand or the right recipe to follow — and then there are other cooks who can simply walk into the kitchen, take a look at the ingredients that they have on hand, and think up (and execute) a delicious home-cooked meal. Regardless of which type of cook you are, your ability to make a meal from scratch relies on a repertoire of solid cooking techniques and knife skills. While most of those techniques are the necessary basics (like chopping, roasting, frying, and sautéing) it also helps to have a few more advanced cooking skills in your culinary arsenal.

Click here for the Pro Cooking Techniques That Anyone Can Pull Off (Slideshow)

Though some of the more advanced cooking techniques may sound fancy or inaccessible, you’ll be surprised to find out that they’re not really as difficult (or as complicated) as they seem. Even French techniques like chiffonade, for example, can be remarkably simple: just stack, roll, and slice leafy greens to produce long, thin ribbons perfect for salads and garnishes.

If you’ve got a good handle on the most basic skills in the kitchen (and you can bake, boil, fry, and grill foods like a pro), then it may be time to move on to some more advanced techniques. Learning how to flambé chicken or sweat vegetables, for example, can add a tremendous amount of flavor to dishes, and new knife skills (like cutting suprêmes from citrus fruits) will allow you to plate your food in a way that is elegant, refined, and professional-looking.

We’ve rounded up eight techniques that are perfect for cooks of any skill level who are ready to learn something new. Though these techniques are frequently used by the pros, they’re easy for anyone to pull off.


This cooking technique involves two simple steps. Just boil the fruit or vegetable that you want to blanch and then dip it in ice water to stop the cooking. This technique is perfect for softening produce slightly without eliminating its bright, vibrant color.


Braising is a technique that’s often applied to meats to tenderize them and intensify their flavors. Start by browning the meat over relatively high heat. Then, when it is colored on all sides, remove it from the pot, sauté a flavorful mirepoix, add a little liquid (and scrape up the brown bits on the bottom of the pan), and then return the meat to the pan and let it cook, partially submerged, in the liquid.

Kristie Collado is The Daily Meal’s Cook Editor. Follow her on Twitter @KColladoCook.


Oven-Roasted Pulled Pork

Everyone needs a good pulled-pork recipe, and this, my friends, is the BEST. Insanely tender and loaded with barbecue flavor, you'll dream about it (sandwiched between a soft potato bun) often. And that's okay, considering how easy it is to make.

What cut of pork should I buy?

This recipe calls for boneless pork shoulder. Though there's not a lot of fat, it loses it toughness with the long cook time. You could also use pork butt, which has more marbled fat and will result in even more flavorful and tender meat.

Why cook pulled pork in the oven and not the slow cooker?

Our slow-cooker pulled pork is bomb, and we love that we can just dump everything&mdashsauce ingredients and all&mdashin at once. But it also takes longer&ndashat least 5 hours. And, more importantly, in a slow cooker, you miss out on burnt ends.

What are burnt ends? They're the blackened edges that are a result of the fat and sauce ingredients caramelizing.

Do I need to sear the meat first?

If you want burnt ends (and I know you do!), then yes. And if you're using a Dutch oven, it's a quick and easy step. That said, it's not 100 percent necessary.

Can I use store-bought sauce?

Yep! Though you should know our recipe requires ingredients you likely have in your pantry already.

Can I skip the beer?

Short answer: Yes. But you'll need to sub in an equal amount of another liquid, like apple cider. But if you want to leave it out just because you don't like it, reconsider! Beer pairs really nicely with pork, and in the oven, it takes on a caramelly, toasty flavor.

What else can I do besides sandwiches?

The limit does not exist. Tacos with pineapple slaw, pulled-pork crescent rings, and BBQ shepherd's pie are just a few of our amazing pulled-pork recipe ideas.

Have you made this recipe?

If yes, YAY! Rate the recipe below, and let us know how you liked it!

Editor's Note: After reviewing comments about the BBQ sauce, we have since retested this recipe and have reduced the amount of apple cider vinegar. If you like a tangier sauce, you can add up to double the amount of vinegar.


Barefoot Contessa: Cook Like a Pro

Ina teaches the essential recipes and techniques every cook must know to achieve success in the kitchen.

Ina's Most-Requested Recipes

Her Favorite Weeknight Dinner 23 Videos

Ina's crispy Parmesan Chicken is ready in just 30 minutes.

More Barefoot Contessa

11 Entertaining Do's and Don'ts 13 Photos

Ina knows the ins and outs of pulling off the perfect evening.

All the Recipes

Get Ina's best recipes, including her roast chicken.

What You Didn't Know 20 Photos

Before running her store, Ina worked at the White House.

A Day in the Life 7 Photos

Visit Ina in her home to see what her day is like.

Hostess with the Most 8 Photos

Step inside the kitchen Ina uses for filming her show.

On the Job and Loving It

For Ina, every recipe is tested until it's perfect to print.

Cooking for Jeffrey

In her most-personal cookbook yet, Ina reveals the go-to recipes she loves to cook for her favorite person, her husband, Jeffrey.

Episodes

Cook Like a Pro: Cocktail Party Rules

Ina Garten's sharing her recipe for pulling off a perfect cocktail party, so get the invitations ready. Her spread includes five incredible appetizers, starting with crazy-delicious Roasted Shrimp Cocktail Louis and elegant and easy no-cook Herbed Fromage Blanc, which is simple to make for entertaining a crowd. Then she prepares Lamb Sausage in Puff Pastry and Zucchini and Gruyere Frittata Squares, all washed down with an ice cold Classic Daiquiri. Ina also reveals pro tips for everything from shortcut hors d'oeuvres to how to send out the invites and the best way to set up the bar and food table.

Cook Like a Pro: Tex-Mex Entertaining

Ina Garten has all the bases covered when it comes to Tex-Mex entertaining. She makes a light and airy Tres Leches Cake with Berries and Make Ahead Whipped Cream, and her crowd-pleasing Pork Posole is a spicy, all-in-one main course piled high with fixings. Fiesta Corn and Avocado Salad is an easy first course that also works as a side dish or salsa. Finally, Ina raises her glass to cocktail hour with the fire and ice of frosty Jalapeno Margaritas, shaken like a pro!

Cook Like a Pro: Portable Food

It's food on the move with Ina Garten as she shares pro tips for perfect portable eats. She makes moist Lemon Poppy Seed Cake for an afternoon snack at work and Tomato Mozzarella Pan Bagnat -- a fantastic Provencal sandwich -- for lunch on the go. Charlie Bird's Farro Salad with Lemon Dressing is Ina's answer when the question is what to take to a potluck party, and her Fresh Blueberry Rhubarb Jam makes a sweet gift for any occasion.

Cook Like a Pro: Mary Poppins Show

Ina Garten hosts an incredible Mary Poppins reunion sharing cooking secrets and making a British-style Sunday lunch for her friends who produced, directed and acted in the new movie. She shows Emily Blunt her foolproof Roasted Capon recipe and Emily shows her how to make her Perfect Roast Potatoes. There's a Roasted Haricots Verts master class for Lin-Manuel Miranda who's helping Hollywood director and producer duo Rob Marshall and John DeLuca mix up Pomegranate Gimlet cocktails. Dessert Meringue Clouds round off a magical Mary Poppins-inspired table setting.

Cook Like a Pro: Salads for Four Seasons

Ina Garten is sharing her pro tips for sensational salads for every season. For an all-in-one spring dinner, her Crispy Mustard Chicken and Frisee Salad is unbeatable, and Tarragon Shrimp Salad is perfect for an easy and delicious summer lunch. Then for autumn, Ina makes Faro Tabbouleh with Feta, a twist on a classic dish, and her Tricolore Salad with Orange is an incredible winter side dish.

Cook Like a Pro: Seafood

Ina Garten is sharing all her seafood secrets and pro tips, starting with her recipe for Cioppino, a satisfying one-pot stew with cod, shrimp, scallops and mussels. Her Bay Scallops Ceviche with marinated, raw scallops is an easy, no-cook appetizer, and Salmon with Melting Cherry Tomatoes is a fast and foolproof dinner. Ina wraps things up with a perfect high-low mix of Warm Lobster Rolls, a classic with the volume turned up.

Cook Like a Pro: Beefed Up

Ina Garten is setting her sights on beef and sharing her tips for preparing it roasted, ground, sliced, sauteed and seared just like a pro. She starts with the perfect steak, an easy and elegant Filet Mignon with Mustard and Mushrooms. Then she turns humble ground beef into the most delicious Individual Meatloaves, and there's even beef for breakfast in Roast Beef Hash with Eggs. For a stellar first course, Ina makes Filet of Beef Carpaccio sliced wafer thin.

Cook Like a Pro: Cook With a Pro

Ina Garten gets a cooking masterclass with three amazing professional chefs. Pastry chef Natasha Pickowicz teaches Ina how to make the most incredible Roasted Carrot Tart, and Parisian chef Marie-Aude Rose shares her secrets to making perfect Crepes and Chocolate Sauce. Chef Missy Robbins reveals the secrets of pasta as she makes Fettucine with Buffalo Butter and Parmigiano Reggiano using just a handful of ingredients.

Cook Like a Pro: Farm Stand

It's all about farm-to-table cooking for Ina Garten's spring feast, with a dinner, side dish, salad and dessert inspired by the farm stand. There's amazing Rosemary Rack of Lamb with Easy Tzatziki and Parmesan Roasted Zucchini, which are great for entertaining in the spring or any time of year. Then Ina's hitting the farm stand and making Fresh Corn Pancakes and an easy Tuscan Tomato and Bread Salad with a Red Wine Vinaigrette. For a sweet finish, she makes Fresh Berries and Sweet Ricotta with Raspberry and Blackberry Sauce.

Cook Like a Pro: Good Grilling

Ina Garten is fired up and sharing her advice for grilling and barbecuing like a pro. To start, hot coals work their magic on her Tuscan Grilled Cornish Hens, and she amps up the flavor on Foolproof Ribs with Barbecue Sauce. Her flame-grilled Smoky Eggplant Dip features yogurt and mint, and her husband Jeffrey can't resist her Grilled Oysters with Lemon Dill Butter.

Cook Like a Pro: Perfect Pastry

Ina Garten shares tips and ideas for cooking with sweet, savory and even store-bought pastry. She starts with her foolproof Sweet Pastry Dough for a showstopping French Fig Tart. She uses a shortcut to make Spinach in Puff Pastry, and her Cacio e Pepe Cheese Puffs are irresistible appetizers. Ina finishes her pastry extravaganza with Warm Goat Cheese in Phyllo.

Cook Like a Pro: Salads for Four Seasons

Ina Garten is sharing her pro tips for sensational salads for every season. For an all-in-one spring dinner, her Crispy Mustard Chicken and Frisee Salad is unbeatable, and Tarragon Shrimp Salad is perfect for an easy and delicious summer lunch. Then for autumn, Ina makes Faro Tabbouleh with Feta, a twist on a classic dish, and her Tricolore Salad with Orange is an incredible winter side dish.

Cook Like a Pro: Good Ingredients

Ina Garten shares recipes that use her favorite good ingredients starting with good chocolate in her Chocolate Pecan Meringue Torte. Next, good maple syrup and lemon are turned into sublime side dishes including Maple-Roasted Acorn Squash as well as Tuscan Roasted Potatoes and Lemon. Good mustard is the magic ingredient in her Crispy Chicken Thighs with Mustard Sauce that are good enough for company. Finally, good salt is the secret to her Salty Oatmeal Chocolate Chunk Cookies -- officially Ina's favorite cookies ever.

Cook Like a Pro: Herbs All Ways

Ina Garten is cooking with her favorite herbs and sharing tips for turning up the flavor. She incorporates rosemary, oregano and mint in her Pork Souvlaki with Radish Tzatziki and Pitas for an easy dinner. Dill, chives and basil shine in her Heirloom Tomatoes with Herbed Ricotta, and there's more basil plus parsley in Parmesan Pesto Zucchini Sticks. Finally, thyme is the magic ingredient in Warm Marinated Olives, and Ina offers tips for growing and storing herbs.

Cook Like a Pro: Easy High Low

Ina Garten loves mixing fancy and casual fare, and she's sharing her secrets to this winning mashup of high and low. She takes everyday Potato and Celery Root Puree over the top with truffle butter and serves it with stunning Seared Scallops. Then she pairs an elegant Roast Filet of Beef with simple Mustard Mayo Horseradish and Crusty Baked Potatoes with Whipped Feta. Finally, she adds a little fizz to dessert with an awesome Raspberry and Cream Sgroppino.

Cook Like a Pro: Tex-Mex Entertaining

Ina Garten has all the bases covered when it comes to Tex-Mex entertaining. She makes a light and airy Tres Leches Cake with Berries and Make Ahead Whipped Cream, and her crowd-pleasing Pork Posole is a spicy, all-in-one main course piled high with fixings. Fiesta Corn and Avocado Salad is an easy first course that also works as a side dish or salsa. Finally, Ina raises her glass to cocktail hour with the fire and ice of frosty Jalapeno Margaritas, shaken like a pro!

Cook Like a Pro: Seafood

Ina Garten is sharing all her seafood secrets and pro tips, starting with her recipe for Cioppino, a satisfying one-pot stew with cod, shrimp, scallops and mussels. Her Bay Scallops Ceviche with marinated, raw scallops is an easy, no-cook appetizer, and Salmon with Melting Cherry Tomatoes is a fast and foolproof dinner. Ina wraps things up with a perfect high-low mix of Warm Lobster Rolls, a classic with the volume turned up.

Cook Like a Pro: Portable Food

It's food on the move with Ina Garten as she shares pro tips for perfect portable eats. She makes moist Lemon Poppy Seed Cake for an afternoon snack at work and Tomato Mozzarella Pan Bagnat -- a fantastic Provencal sandwich -- for lunch on the go. Charlie Bird's Farro Salad with Lemon Dressing is Ina's answer when the question is what to take to a potluck party, and her Fresh Blueberry Rhubarb Jam makes a sweet gift for any occasion.

About the Show

The Barefoot Contessa is back, and this time she is teaching viewers how to cook like a pro. You've been invited to all of her fabulous parties, and now America's hostess with the mostess, Ina Garten, lifts the veil on all her tips, sharing techniques and professional strategies along with incredibly elegant and easy recipes.


The temperature of the pork rises steadily to 150 degrees Fahrenheit, and then hovers there for what feels like forever while the moisture moves to the surface and evaporates. It may hold that temperature between 150 and 160 degrees Fahrenheit for up to five hours. Be patient don't crank up the heat just yet or open the lid. The big determining factor of the duration of the stall is the thickness of the meat.

When is it ready? Depends on the size. The internal temperature needs to get to at least 195 degrees Fahrenheit, which will take 8-10 hours.

Once that happens, try these tests:

If you are cooking a bone-in pork butt, use a glove or paper towel to protect your fingers and wiggle the bone. It should easily turn and come out of the meat. This means she is done.

If you are smoking a boneless butt, insert a fork in the meat and try to rotate it. If it turns with only a little torque, your meat is done.

The color of your pork butt could be misleading. The exterior should look dark brown in color.

If the pork butt hasn't reached the desired internal temperature, or isn't tender, close the lid and let it cook for another 30 minutes before you check again.

If it is still not tender enough, you may have a tough butt. Try wrapping it in aluminum foil and let it go for another hour. However, do not take it above 205 degrees Fahrenheit or the muscle fibers will start giving up moisture and toughen.


To make sure your items are cooking evenly, give the basket a few shakes during cooking. You can keep the air fryer running and just remove the basket without any problems. This is especially useful for small items that you want to crisp all over, like fries or small roasted veggies. A few shakes should be enough, and it'll help ensure everything turns out crisp and consistent.

You might think that coating your food in lots of oil will cause it to become more crispy in the air fryer, but less is actually more when it comes to oil. Too much olive oil and your food could actually get soggy instead of crisp. Go easy on the olive oil for maximum flavor and texture.


More items to explore

Cook Like a Pro by Ina Garten

Chicken Thighs with Creamy Mustard Sauce

Serves 4

I like doing the high-low thing: taking an inexpensive cut of meat like chicken thighs and serving it with a rich, flavorful sauce made with white wine, crème fraîche, and lots of mustard. It’s also fun to serve it in a casual way by placing the skillet in the middle of the table and letting everyone help themselves.

Recipe

Place the chicken thighs on a cutting board, skin side up, and pat them dry with paper towels. Sprinkle the chicken with 1½ teaspoons salt and ¾ teaspoon pepper. Turn them over and sprinkle them with one more teaspoon of salt.

Heat 1 tablespoon olive oil in a large (11- to 12-inch) cast-iron skillet over medium heat. When the oil is hot, place the chicken in the pan in one layer, skin side down. Cook over medium heat for 15 minutes without moving them, until the skin is golden brown. (If the skin gets too dark, turn the heat to medium low.) Turn the chicken pieces with tongs, add the onions to the pan, including under the chicken, and cook over medium heat for 15 minutes, stirring the onions occasionally, until the thighs are cooked to 155 to 160 degrees and the onions are browned. Transfer the chicken (not the onions) to a plate and allow to rest uncovered while you make the sauce. If the onions aren’t browned, cook them for another minute.

Add the wine, crème fraîche, Dijon mustard, whole-grain mustard, and 1 teaspoon salt to the skillet and stir over medium heat for one minute. Return the chicken, skin side up, and the juices to the skillet, sprinkle with parsley, and serve hot.

Pro Tip:

To ensure the chicken cooks evenly, choose thighs that are similar in size.

Ingredients:

  • 8 medium bone-in, skin-on chicken thighs (2¼ pounds)
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • Good olive oil
  • 2 cups halved and thinly sliced yellow onion (2 onions)
  • 2 tablespoons dry white wine
  • 8 ounces crème fraîche
  • 1 tablespoon good Dijon mustard
  • 1 teaspoon whole-grain mustard
  • 1 teaspoon whole-grain mustard

Classic Daiquiris, Updated.

Panna Cotta with Fresh Raspberry Sauce.


The Easiest Way to Cut a Watermelon Like a Pro

To me cold juicy watermelon is summers&rsquo ultimate thirst quencher (well it is over 90 percent water!). And now that most of the melons in the market are seedless, it&rsquos easier than ever to dive in and eat/drink without spitting (or swallowing) seeds. They&rsquore smaller than traditional long melons, and perfect in delicious watermelon recipes from salads to salsas to slushies &mdash even watermelon pizza.

If you have room in your fridge, the best value deal is to buy a whole watermelon. And if you do have room, that's exactly what you should do: don't get intimidated by the prospect of slicing and dicing the heavy melon. With a few easy tips, it's actually quite easy.

How to prepare your watermelon

No matter if you want to slice your watermelon into triangles, batons, cubes, or just peel it, you'll have to start with these three steps.

1. Rinse it thoroughly

. since bacteria lurks on melon skin, and you don&rsquot want to drag it into your melon.

2. Slice off both ends

. on a clean cutting board, using a large serrated knife (or sharp chef&rsquos knife).

3. Halve the melon

. by standing it on one cut end and slicing all the way through. To make triangles or batons, slice it lengthwise. To peel and/or cube the watermelon, slice it crosswise. Note: the melon will keep better uncut so unless you&rsquore prepping for a party, wrap one half in plastic and refrigerate.

How to make watermelon triangles

1. Place one half cut-side down on a cutting board

. and slice vertically down the middle from end to end to make quarters.

2. Cut 1 to 1½ inch slices across the quartered melon

How to make watermelon batons

This is the best way to serve watermelon at a party. No more messy cheeks and extra drippy chins. You have just enough rind to hold onto and the rest gets eaten.

1. Make vertical slices down the length of the melon

. with the rind on, at 1 to 1½ inch intervals.

2. Cut crosswise down the width of the melon

. at 1 to 1½ inch intervals to form a grid.

3. Separate into batons and serve

How to peel a watermelon

1. Slice off both ends and halve melon crosswise

. then stand up on one cut end.

2. Cut downward in following the shape of the melon to remove strips of rind.

3. Rotate the melon and continue until all skin has been removed.

Go back and trim away any remaining white.

How to cube watermelon

Just because it says cubed, remember these don't have to be perfect!

1. Slice the peeled melon at 1 to 1½ inch intervals to make slabs

. then, stack a few up and slice vertically then horizontally to create cube-like pieces.

2. Transfer to a bowl and repeat with the remaining slabs

. and then the other half of melon if using.

Or if you're you're feeling lazy try this handy watermelon-cutting tool, available on Amazon.


You Use Too Much or Too Little Oil

While some recipes don’t use any oil, most do𠅊nd it’s still significantly less than oils used in standard fried recipes. You only really need 1-2 teaspoons for most recipes or 1-2 tablespoons for breaded items.

𠇏or breaded recipes (chicken fingers, fish sticks) I like to mix the breadcrumbs with a 1-2 Tbsp of oil and it works great! For other recipes you can just brush lightly with oil - it ends up being only 1-2 tsp per serving (or less) for most recipes,” she says.

Again though, it depends on the recipe—“some recipes need no oil at all, others you can get away with a light coating of oil spray—I use all kinds, depending what I am making," she says.

Just don’t go too crazy with the oil. “Using too much oil can cause oil to drip and hit the bottom tray - this can lead the excess oil to burn and smoke! No fun,” she says.


Choose the Cut

The first step when making smoked pulled pork barbecue is deciding which cut of pork you want to use. Unlike brisket, pulled pork can be made from any fatty pork roast or from a whole hog, but the best cut for pulled pork is the shoulder. High in fat and connective tissue, the shoulder is the most flavorful part of the hog. The pork shoulder is typically cut into two parts, the Boston butt and the picnic roast. You can use either for this method, but the Boston butt is the best since it's easier to work with, uniform in shape, and contains the right ratio of fat to lean. Look for a Boston butt that is rectangular in shape with a layer of fat on one side. The color should be a rich pink to purple and the meat firm to the touch.


Smoked Pulled pork on the smoker

Once the rub has been added, it is time to start cooking!

I cook pork shoulders at 225 or 250 degrees. At 250 the pork shoulder will cook a little faster, but you’ll sacrifice moisture.

Once your smoker is up to temp, open the lid on your smoker, and put the meat on the grate. Life will be easier for you if you purchase a grill rack. If you have a grill rack, place your meat on that, and then place the rack inside the smoker.

Sometimes I’ll smoke my pork shoulders in a large cast-iron skillet. That’s a good alternative to a grill rack.

Using the rack or skillet will make it easier for you to remove the meat at the end of the cook.

In fact, if you have a grill rack you can prep your shoulder on the rack, inside of a foil-lined pan. This makes your prep work cleanup very easy!

Once the pork shoulder is in the smoker, it’s a waiting game.

Smoking Pulled Pork is a Waiting Game

For the first five hours of the cook don’t open the lid on your smoker. I will check the level of my pellets (I use a Traeger), but otherwise, leave the smoker alone! After five hours open the lid and spritz the pork shoulder with apple juice. Continue this process every hour.

After about 8 hours of smoking check the internal temp with a Thermapen or your favorite meat thermometer. At this point, the internal temperature of the pork shoulder should be close to 160 degrees. If a good bark has formed wrap the pork shoulder with butcher paper, and continue to let it cook.

Wrapping Pork Shoulder

This will help the meat retain moisture, and with pulled pork, it’s not a bad option. Wrapping the meat at this point will also speed up the cook considerably! At around 160 degrees big pieces of meat like pork shoulder go through what is called a stall. If you don’t wrap, the meat could stay at this temp for hours! The butcher paper wrap helps speed up the process of the stall, while keeping moisture in the meat, and letting air come in to add to the bark.

When the internal temp of the pork shoulder hits 200+ you’re not done.

Pull the meat off the grill, wrap it in foil over the butcher paper, and put it in a cooler with a bunch of towels. The best smoked meats rest.

Skipping this step is not optional!! I like my pork shoulders to rest a minimum of one hour, but if you can stretch it to two hours, you’ll have an even better tasting cook. I’ve let pork shoulders rest up to five hours using this method and the meat was still piping hot when I pulled it out of the cooler to shred it.

After the rest, it’s time to unwrap the meat, shred it, and eat! I like to serve pulled pork with buns, coleslaw, hot peppers, pickled onions, and barbecue sauce.

If you’ve made it this far you’ve successfully made your first pork shoulder and hopefully, you’ve learned a few things about your smoker along the way!

Items to Buy Today – or soon – In Order of Importance

    – The only barbecue tool I use more than this is my Traeger Pro 34 – This rack makes it easy to transport food from the kitchen to the smoker, and back again. – Sometimes the most difficult part of cooking a pork shoulder is shredding it. These claws change that. – Because sometimes you want some dexterity when you reach in the smoker.

Pulled Pork Leftover Ideas

If you’re looking for ways to use pulled pork in leftovers, check out these options:

One Last Thing

I understand how intimidating it can be to smoke a big cut of meat. I’ve spent a lot of time with my smoker, and I’ve failed quite a few times too! Hopefully, you found this guide to smoking pulled pork helpful and will ease your concerns about cooking something low and slow on your pellet grill.

Do you have questions about cooking your first pork shoulder? Send me an email or connect with me on Instagram! I love helping people make great food on their smoker!