Cocktail Recipes, Spirits, and Local Bars

Dream Drinking: All-in-One Vintage Arcade and Kegerator

Dream Drinking: All-in-One Vintage Arcade and Kegerator

The inner beer and gaming geek is coming out in us

The unit from the California-based company comes pre-loaded with true arcade versions of 140 classic games — think Ms. Pac Man, Centipede, Galaga, Street Fighter, and even Pong.

We may have reached peak beer geek. We’re talking geek in the original sense here, because the new creation from Dream Arcades is directly aimed at gamers who love their brew. The Kegerator Pro 60 is the world’s first 60-inch arcade machine with three refrigerated taps built right in.

The unit from the California-based company comes pre-loaded with true arcade versions of 140 classic games — think Ms. Pac Man, Centipede, Galaga, Street Fighter, and even Pong. You can also use the K-Pro 60 to connect to the Internet and surf the web on the 60-inch HD LED screen, and the box is pre-loaded with MP3 software, so you can turn it into a DJ station and make it the center of any party. That’s because in addition to all the tech whiz-bang, the K-Pro 60 is at heart, a home draft system. You can put three different beverage into the trio of tap lines, and then pull pints whenever you feel like it — even in the middle of an intense game.

The Kegerator Pro 60 is now available for sale; list price $4,999. There are also several add-on packs with dozens of additional games and other upgrades. Maybe convince a few pals to go in on a shared unit?

— Danya Henninger, The Drink Nation

More From The Drink Nation:

7 Spirits Made With Hops: An Unlikely but Trendy Match
Ivanabitch Introduces World's First Tobacco Flavored Vodka
Heineken Can't Compete With Craft Beer, Says CEO


These I Dream Of Jeannie Secrets Weren’t Known At The Time

Larry Hagman was more than just a demanding diva – he was a belligerent drunk who urinated on furniture on-set when he didn’t get his way. In her autobiography, Barbara Eden went into more detail about Larry’s crazy behavior. “He started every day at the studio drinking vast quantities of champagne,” Barbara wrote, “and in between scenes, he sequestered himself in his dressing room, smoking pot and downing yet more champagne, all in the interests of maintaining a calm serenity.”


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‘Simply place a keg of your favourite brew in the refrigerated chamber and plug in the unit. To dispense the beverage, just pull the tap’s lever,’ the company wrote.

Kegs for the fridge cost an average of £70 ($117) for 12 litres - or 21 pints.

This works out at £5.80 ($9.75) a pint, which means users will pay slightly more than in a pub or bar.

To get beer out of the keg, gas pressure is applied to the top surface of the liquid, which presses the beer from the bottom of the keg up through that metal tube and out of the valve.

For those who want something more, California-based Dream Arcades has gone one better by creating the $5,000 (£2,970) Kegerator Pro 60. The device comes with built-in fridge, a keg with three taps, and more than 140 classic video games. The arcade also has a massive 60-inch HDTV screen

The in-built refrigerator keeps beer fresh by storing and serving it between -1 and 7°C (30-45°F).

For those who want something more, California-based Dream Arcades last year created the $5,000 (£2,970) Kegerator Pro 60.

The device comes with built-in fridge, a keg with three taps, and more than 140 classic arcade games. The arcade also has a 60-inch HDTV screen.

‘Players never have to stop the action to refill their drink’ the company said in a statement.

The arcade also has two built-in cup holders ‘so players can keep their drinks topped off while keeping one hand on the joystick.'

BEER FRIDGE THAT MEANS YOU'LL NEVER HAVE TO LEAVE THE GARDEN

As temperatures rise, it is the perfect way to keep your beers cool - and not have to make the long trek to the fridge when you need a refill.

A Danish firm has unveiled an underground beer fridge that can be sunk into the garden.

It takes advantage of cooler underground conditions to keep beer chilled.

Called the eCool, it sinks 24 beers underground.

When beers are removed, the next is automatically pushed to the top using a pulley system.

The entire system, which is just over a metre in height, is sunk underground.

'It’s advised to use a garden drill, but can be installed with a shovel as well, if you’re a real man,' the firm says.

It says the system is ideal for eco-friendly beer drinkers as it uses no electricity.

'Do something great for yourself and the environment.

'It’s easy to install in the garden or terrace, and uses no electricity.

'With the eCool you can always drink a cold beer with good conscience.

The earth cooler is 113 cm in height, 22-30 cm in diameter and weighs 12 kg.


You Know You Want This 60-Inch HD Arcade Machine With A Built-In Kegerator

What if you combined your three favourite things into one big toy? What’s that? You would combine beer, video games, and high definition TV? No need to imagine, folks. Such a machine exists, and it only costs $US5000.

OK, $US5000 is a lot of money, but big price tags often mean big fun. The Kegerator Pro 60 is an all-in-one gaming-and-drinking machine just released by Deram Arcades. The machine features a 60-inch HDTV screen with an arcade machine that plays 140 classic games. Crystal Castles, Paperboy, Mortal Combat, Space Invaders — they’re all there. It also comes with a kegerator that can handle three taps. That means you can have three different frosty beverages going at once. And two of the taps are located right next to joysticks, so you never have to stop playing. All that said, this actually isn’t the first arcade-kegerator combo, but it is the most extreme.

Now, shut up and take my money. [Dream Arcades]

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Dream Drinking: All-in-One Vintage Arcade and Kegerator - Recipes

Try the signature Moscow Mule at this classic city pub in the blossoming Avondale neighborhood.

  • Monday 4:30pm - 12:00am
  • Tuesday 4:30pm - 12:00am
  • Wednesday 4:30pm - 12:00am
  • Thursday 4:30pm - 12:00am
  • Friday 4:30pm - 2:00am
  • Saturday 1:00pm - 2:00am
  • Sunday 1:00pm - 12:00am

A sprawling backyard and live music stage set this brewery apart from the rest. Choose from one of six flagship beers or seasonal offerings.

  • Monday 4:00pm - 10:00pm
  • Tuesday 4:00pm - 10:00pm
  • Wednesday 4:00pm - 10:00pm
  • Thursday 4:00pm - 11:00pm
  • Friday 3:00pm - 12:30am
  • Saturday 12:00pm - 12:30am
  • Sunday 1:00pm - 10:00pm

Located near Railroad Park in a former beer distribution warehouse and across from the minor league baseball stadium. Cornhole and other games in the industrial outdoor seating area.

  • Monday 1:00pm - 10:00pm
  • Tuesday 1:00pm - 10:00pm
  • Wednesday 1:00pm - 10:00pm
  • Thursday 1:00pm - 12:00am
  • Friday 1:00pm - 12:00am
  • Saturday 1:00pm - 12:00am
  • Sunday 1:00pm - 8:00pm

A liquor store and a classic bar that’s just the right kind of gritty, this watering hole was named one of the best bars by Esquire. Twice a week, barkeep Angel Negrín holds Church Night, and a group of bartenders gather to shake things up with creative cocktails. For a real Sazerac (or a twist on one), this is the place to go.

Insider Tip: Follow @DryCocktails on Twitter or Instagram, and watch for the #churchnight menus at @LousPub.

Perfect cuppa joe in the morning and carefully crafted cocktails at night.

  • Monday 7:00am - 10:00pm
  • Tuesday 7:00am - 10:00pm
  • Wednesday 7:00am - 11:00pm
  • Thursday 7:00am - 11:00pm
  • Friday 7:00am - 12:00am
  • Saturday 8:00am - 12:00am
  • Sunday 8:00am - 10:00pm

With an old-school arcade in the back, this kid-friendly bar serves up playful cocktails (Pabst Cup: Pimm’s, simple syrup, lemon, and PBR), flights that pair drinks with arcade games, and 20 beers on tap.

On the menu: Alabama hummus (made with boiled peanuts), a Hot Chicken Sammich with habanero-buttermilk fried chicken, burgers, dogs, and floats.

Insider Tip: Rainy days bring a $5 special on a Dark & Stormy.


Sunday, 23 August 2009

Jackanory

I try and read as much as possible when I’m at home but going on holiday is the perfect time to really plough through a few books that have been on the shelf for a while. In the same way that I like to share the good beers that I drink, I want to share the good books that I read, especially when they are about beer.

Pete Brown’s Three Sheets To The Wind. I’d been meaning to read this for ages but don’t get through huge amounts of nonfiction at home. But I love nonfiction while reading on the beach. Three Sheets is Pete’s world-wide search for the meaning of beer. It’s funny, it’s ridiculously well observed, it’s well researched and a joy to read. I get through a lot of beer reading and can honestly say that I learnt more from this than anything else I’ve read. It made me think about the personal essence of beer and drinking, and about why I love it so much. It gave me massive wanderlust.

Pete Brown’s Hops and Glory. I finished Three Sheets then went on to Hops and Glory. This is an epic book in so many ways. The story itself is huge brewing and taking a cask/keg of beer from Burton to India via sea. The history and the research is also epic. It’s doctoral thesis scholarly but in the most readable of ways. It’s got Pete’s laconic humour, his fragile sense of emotion and being and a true beating heart. It's an energetic travelogue and it’s filled with the type of descriptive prose that nineteenth century romance novelists would be jealous of. I could wax lyrical on and on about this… but as someone who wants to write and who loves beer, Hops & Glory is a brilliant inspiration.
Sam Calagione’s Brewing Up A Business. If you want to work for BrewDog then this book is part of the training. It’s Sam’s guide to running a small business and it’s filled with so many great stories about Dogfish Head Brewery. I laughed my way through this, I fell in love with his hard-working ethic, his charisma, his desire to succeed and I was completely inspired again. Whether you want to start your own business/brewery or you just love beer, this is a book to read.

Tim Lebbon’s Bar None. Tim is part of the Blog O’ Beer crew. He is also a successful novelist. I got an email a while back asking if I’d like a copy and said yes. It arrived two days before I left for holiday so it was squeezed into my hand luggage. It’s the post-apocalyptic journey of a handful of survivors to the safe haven of a pub. And beer is very important. The protagonist can only remember his wife when he drinks and it’s both heart-breaking and heart-warming at the same time. It’s a great walk through memory and time and place and people and I really liked it. The joy of this book is in the way that memories are linked through beer, kind of like the Taste of Memories.

Next I read two non-beer books by Malcom Gladwell. I read Outliers just after it was released and then bought Blink and Tipping Point. Let me say this: I think Malcom Gladwell is one of the greatest writers of our time. He thinks in a way and with a precision of mind that is impossible to comprehend until you read his words. Blink is about the moments when we know something without knowing why - it’s that snap judgment in the blink of an eye. Tipping Point is about the ascension to a moment where a thing ‘tips’ from being unimportant to incredibly important. Outliers is the story of why some people achieve so much more than others. All are awesome feats of academic and psychosocial thinking. If you haven’t read any Malcom Gladwell then you really must.

Chuck Palahnuik’s Invisible Monsters was the last book and I’ve been reading a lot of his stuff recently. This is my favourite book by him it’s brilliant.

Some of the best moments of my holiday were sitting down in the evening sun and opening one of these books and a cold Mythos. I really do love sitting in the sun, reading and drinking a cold beer. In fact, as it’s a gloriously sunny day today, I think that’s how I’ll be spending my afternoon and evening.


9 Great Man Cave Hacks That Won’t Break the Bank of Dad

An old couch here, an elsewhere-forbidden neon beer sign there – if you have a man cave, it’s probably not the most planned-out room in your house. Unless you’re among the most dedicated cave dwellers, your first man cave likely came together in pieces and could, therefore, use a good tune-up.

Luckily, you came to the right place. If you’re looking to impress guests this football season, check out these man cave hacks that will take your man cave to the next level.

The Bar – Kegerators, Bottle Openers, and Liquor Dispensers

Instead, go DIY with a kegerator. With nothing more than an old fridge and an online kit, you can build your own keg fridge for far less than a bar tap. And nothing is better than drinking beer from a tap you built yourself.

If you prefer your beer in a bottle, a wall-mounted bottle opener is an absolute must in your cave. A portable bottle opener is just begging to get lost and while someone may have an opener on his keychain, why leave things to chance? It’s easy to find an awesome selection of wall-mounted openers online, but don’t forget to build a box below the opener to catch bottle caps for easy disposal.

While a nice liquor display never goes out of style, a liquor dispenser makes it easier to pour shots when your team scores a touchdown. You can find wall mounted or freestanding dispensers online, but the DIY options definitely look cooler.

The Entertainment System – TV Size, Proper Sound, and Speedy Internet

The TV is likely the centerpiece of your man cave, but are you getting the most out of it? If you want a bigger screen so you can better see when the refs are being idiots, there are a few options. You can get a bigger TV or look into a projector (here’s a great guide to help you decide).

And while you’re rearranging, don’t neglect the sound system! If you already have a surround sound system, make sure you’re getting the most out of it by using a layout guide and testing different arrangements.

You may have already started streaming the occasional game online – a growing trend. But to ensure your guests don’t bite your head off whenever there’s a network hiccup, hardwire your set top box to your modem. Never trust Wi-Fi when live sports are on the line.

The Extras – Video Game Arcades, Lamps, and DIY Decor

What’s more, these DIY cabinets can feature thousands of titles, letting you relive your glory days without dropping a single quarter. Keep your eyes on local classifieds for broken arcade machines you can gut and restore and your cave will have your classic gamer friends drooling.

Lamps are probably one of the best ways to really add a personalized touch to your man cave. Liquor bottles, antlers, old musical instruments – basically anything you can run a wire through and slap a lampshade on can serve as lighting that adds your own unique flair.

And if you can’t dedicate as many financial resources to your hideaway as you’d like, re-purposed items will look right at home as man cave decor. Cinder blocks can make rugged end tables, pallets work great as a bar shelf or even the bar itself, and old car parts have endless utility.

Spelunking in Style

Getting your man cave ready for the new football season and beyond shouldn’t cost you a ton of time or money. Look for creative hacks and always keep your eyes peeled for decor you can convert and incorporate into your cave.


Moving brewery to garage

I have my brewery currently set up downstairs, though most of the actual brewing takes place in my garage because that’s where my burners are.

I’m tired of running in and out / upstairs and downstairs, so I am moving my set up into the garage.

Does anyone brew in the garage? I have an all-grain setup, but mostly do extracts now. I am hoping that with the convenience of having all in one place it will push me to do an all-grain.

Can anyone think of any issues I may run into? I won’t store ingredients or ferment in the garage, probably stick to the basement for that.

Well-Known Member

I originally brewed in my garage but it became a pain since my equipment was stored in my basement along with my fermenters. It was a pain to haul the equipment up and down the stairs. The advantage was that I was able to hose down the garage floor when I was done.

Since then I have had a gas line hook-up to my burner in my basement kitchen that has a externally vented hood. I learned after the first brew in my basement that the vent hood needs to be on whenever the burner is lit to keep the heat and humidity down. I prefer to brew in my basement. It saves me time from hauling the equipment up and down the stairs. The disadvantages are that I cannot hose the floor down and I have less head room to gravity feed from my mash tun to my boil kettle. It is also more comfortable brewing in my basement in the winter.

The only issue that you may have is hauling the wort down to your basement to ferment, especially if you do high gravity or 10 gallon plus batches.

Soulshine2

Well-Known Member

IslandLizard

Progressive Brewing

DocDriza

Well-Known Member

Stand

Well-Known Member

I do everything in the garage. I've moved as much stuff in there as I possibly can including my fermenter (in an upright freezer). I love it, but it's still somewhat inconvenient because there is so much stuff I don't want to store there.

I think unless you have a dedicated space there's always going to be shuffling, but the garage has worked best for me.

Jtvann

Well-Known Member

I do it all, weather dependent, in both locations. Summer temps are nice enough to brew and ferment in the garage. Winter temps, sub zero at times, means I need to brew and ferment in the basement. I use a DIY glycol chiller.

I'm not sure I understand your question. Is there something you're specifically worried about?

Spartan1979

Supporting Member

JB_Brewing2

Well-Known Member

Stand

Well-Known Member

Hwk-I-St8

Supporting Member

I've always brewed in my garage. The hassle for me was that all my equipment was stored in my basement and I fermented in the basement, so everything was carried up to the garage and back on brewday, including a fermenter full of wort back to the ferm chamber.

I'm in the process of moving (close on Friday) and the new place has a heated garage (important for Iowa winters) and an extra 11x11 wing that will be my dedicated brewery. It has a breaker panel, so I'm hoping to wire in a 240V outlet and switch to electric. One wall has a bathroom on the other side, so I'm hoping I can plumb in a utility sink. It already has a floor drain. I'll set up a condensation rig to handle moisture for winter brewing and I'll be good to go.

Bottom line: No problem brewing in your garage. Even better if you can store everything there too. Weather can be an issue if it's too cold to run water for chilling or no way to vent moisture or carbon monoxide. In the summer, we get really hot and humid, with temps approaching 100 degrees and heat indices around 110. I still brew. It's hot work, but I don't mind the heat. I just need a cool shower when I'm done.

OG-wan Kenobi

Arcane Artisanal Ales

Balrog

Supporting Member

Pigroaster

Member

I do it all, weather dependent, in both locations. Summer temps are nice enough to brew and ferment in the garage. Winter temps, sub zero at times, means I need to brew and ferment in the basement. I use a DIY glycol chiller.

I'm not sure I understand your question. Is there something you're specifically worried about?

Soulshine2

Well-Known Member

I've always brewed in my garage. The hassle for me was that all my equipment was stored in my basement and I fermented in the basement, so everything was carried up to the garage and back on brewday, including a fermenter full of wort back to the ferm chamber.

I'm in the process of moving (close on Friday) and the new place has a heated garage (important for Iowa winters) and an extra 11x11 wing that will be my dedicated brewery. It has a breaker panel, so I'm hoping to wire in a 240V outlet and switch to electric. One wall has a bathroom on the other side, so I'm hoping I can plumb in a utility sink. It already has a floor drain. I'll set up a condensation rig to handle moisture for winter brewing and I'll be good to go.

Bottom line: No problem brewing in your garage. Even better if you can store everything there too. Weather can be an issue if it's too cold to run water for chilling or no way to vent moisture or carbon monoxide. In the summer, we get really hot and humid, with temps approaching 100 degrees and heat indices around 110. I still brew. It's hot work, but I don't mind the heat. I just need a cool shower when I'm done.

Ludesbrews

Well-Known Member

Thanks for all the responses and activity. I’m in the middle of moving into the garage. A few questions:

1) am I good to store ALL consumable ingredients in a fridge in the garage? Forgot that I have a full fridge out there.

2) When boiling, am I good to boil with a propane burner with the garage door completely open?

Spartan1979

Supporting Member

2) When boiling, am I good to boil with a propane burner with the garage door completely open?

Hwk-I-St8

Supporting Member

Verboten

With Low Expectations, you're rarely disappointed

Murphys_Law

Well-Known Member

I have most of my small equipment in a Tupperware which I store in the basement. along with grains, my kegerator, ferm chamber, etc.

I keep my burner, kettle, chiller, etc in the garage.

I brew just outside my back garage door.

Taking equipment up and down is easy but hauling 5G of wort down the steps is becoming a PITA! I use a milk crate to haul the fermonster.

Balrog

Supporting Member

JB_Brewing2

Well-Known Member

Thanks for all the responses and activity. I’m in the middle of moving into the garage. A few questions:

1) am I good to store ALL consumable ingredients in a fridge in the garage? Forgot that I have a full fridge out there.

2) When boiling, am I good to boil with a propane burner with the garage door completely open?

1. You can keep your yeast in the frig section and hops in the freezer section. I don't refrigerate my grains but do keep them in buckets with airtight sealed lids.

2. I have an exhaust fan that handles the moisture from boiling on my electric system but with propane you really need to provide for outside air to avoid hurting yourself or others with the resultant CO2. With the garage door fully open you should be OK as the CO2 should be dispersed. The water vapor from burning and boiling may need a fan to be better dispersed.

Grampamark

Icons clast. Inquire within.

I brew in my basement with propane (gasp!). However-

1. My house is passive solar heated. It is designed to promote airflow from the basement to the upper levels, so there is a constant exchange of air.

2. It’s a daylight basement. The great outdoors is just a few feet away, accessible through various doors and windows.

3. I have a Big Ass Fan running any time the valve on the propane tank is open.

4. About 40 years ago I experienced CO ( not CO2) poisoning to the point of losing consciousness. To this day I can walk into a space which might be high in CO (a job site heated by a space heater, for example) and, if the CO level is high, will get a metallic taste in the back of my mouth within 20-30 seconds. I’m a walking CO detector (and I use one of those, as well).

5. I spent 40 years as a volunteer firefighter. I respect flaming balls of gas, but I don’t fear them.

Mongoose33

Well-Known Member

I ran into the same issue of hauling gear up from the basement, then back down again. It got old real fast.

Now, all the equipment except for the gain mill is in the garage. All the grain and hops are in the basement (hops in the freezer), and the scale.

The trick was finding a way to effectively store stuff in the garage. Naturally, there was no empty space because as everyone knows, junk expands to fill available space. I bought a rolling cabinet in which most of my stuff was stored, so I could wheel it over to my brew area and have everything handy. (Pic below).

I've since done some storage triage in the garage because I have two 10-gallon kettles and two 20-gallon kettles, and one or the other set is always set up.

Once I got my first ferm chamber, I've always fermented in the garage. I'm in Wisconsin but since the garage is insulated and the cars essentially heat it, it never gets below freezing. I have fermwraps or seedling hat mats wrapped around the fermenters when I use the ferm chambers, no worries about cooling too low.

Now, I have a Spike conical and a glycol chiller, so most beers are fermented in that. But i haven't gotten rid of the ferm chambers--they can hold beer, chill bottles prior to filling, serve as an auxiliary keezer when I have no room in the one in my basement.


How to Create a Game Room That Scores Big

A game room is a great addition to any home – especially during this time of sheltering in place. Most people are looking for diversions and entertainment in their own space, and creating a retreat to enjoy your family’s favorite games is the perfect antidote. Whether you are interested in spending game time with your family or enjoying a little solo play, it’s important to do it right. Here are some great tips to make sure your game room has a winning design.

Pick the Right Room

Ideally, you should have a dedicated space for your game room. You need somewhere with enough room for all your gaming equipment and accessories along with whatever extras you may want to add – such as appliances, for example. Of course, make sure your space is large enough to accommodate your family and – once social distancing has ended – friends. Basements and garages are ideal spaces. However, they may need a “new look” to fit the part of your ultimate game room.

Renovate & Decorate

First things first… Clean your space from top to bottom. This is a crucial step if you are renovating a basement or garage. Next, choose your color palette. Decide whether you want a bright and airy space or something more dramatic. You might even consider adding paneling or a wood plank accent wall – a perfect spot for a dart board. If you are passionate about a certain sports team, incorporate the team’s colors and memorabilia throughout the game room. For a more understated space, choose neutral colors and make your room pop with gaming-inspired decor such as posters of your favorite arcade or video games. And, don’t forget about lighting. Choose an inviting mix of different lights to set the perfect ambiance for your room.

Consider Going Retro

What’s your theme? No doubt, one of the most popular themes for a game room is retro. From old-school arcade games, like Mr. Pac-Man, to vintage signage and posters, to retro appliances, this theme is by far the most fun and nostalgic. And, what better way to enhance your retro theme than to add a Northstar Keg Fridge to your game room or man cave? The kegerator is the pinnacle of coolness that will have friends and neighbors flocking to your home to enjoy their favorite beer on tap. Models are uniquely appointed with smooth lines and chrome accents that have given the Northstar line its reputation for being a cut above the rest. Six models are available in nine standard colors. Or, you can match your favorite team’s colors with an almost unlimited selection of custom colors.

Turn up the Volume (Quietly)

Soundproofing is a must to get the full experience of a gaming room – not only to avoid disturbing others in your household, but also to improve the sound quality inside the room. Audio enhances the overall gaming experience and soundproofing helps to enhance the quality and clarity. That means more thrills and excitement! Luckily, common household materials such as thick carpets and wall-mounted acoustic panels make for excellent, affordable soundproofing.

Bring in the Gaming Equipment

Once your room is set up with the perfect decor, it’s time to bring in the gaming equipment. Make sure you take the time to prepare the proper layout to optimize your space and create good flow. From where you place furniture and equipment, to where the cables for your electronics pass through, everything should be in just the right spot to bring out the best in the room’s setting.

Design Tip: Don’t be afraid to get creative! This is your personalized space where you can enjoy all your favorite games and create new memories with your family. After all, an evening full of ‘fun and games’ is not just meant for kids, and – with your ultimate game room – everyone will be entertained in style.

Looking for the perfect fridge for your game room or man cave? Check out the Northstar Keg Fridge!


Free online games for girls

Welcome to Girlsgogames.com, one of the best websites for the cutest and coolest online games in the entire world! Whether you love taking care of horses, making yummy meals, or managing your very own virtual boutique, you can participate in all of those activities in our always growing collection of online games for girls.

Also known as GGG, it’s packed full of unicorn games, coloring games, and so much more! You can work on your culinary skills in our cooking games or create outfits that are stylish or completely outrageous in our dress-up games and design games. If you’ve ever dreamed of working in a hair salon, you can help lots of customers choose the perfect styles in our hair games.

There’s plenty of adorable creatures, both big and small, that you can feed, groom, and play with in our animal games. If you’d rather babysit a terrific tyke instead of a cat or a dog, try one of the baby games. The Baby Hazel series is incredibly popular. In those games, you can team up with a toddler named Hazel while she works in her garden, celebrates holidays, and even goes to the dentist. There’s also tons of craziness and challenges that you’ll find in other popular games like Princesses: Truth or Dare and Poptropica.