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Turkish-style Roast Quince recipe

Turkish-style Roast Quince recipe



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This Turkish dessert made with quince tastes wonderful directly from the oven served with ice cream, cream or mascarpone. Perfect for an autumn dinner party dessert, when quince is in season.

5 people made this

IngredientsServes: 6

  • 3 large quinces (approximately 1.5kg in weight)
  • 80g butter
  • 6 tablespoons sugar
  • mascarpone or cream to serve

MethodPrep:5min ›Cook:2hr ›Ready in:2hr5min

  1. Line a baking tray with aluminium foil and preheat the oven to 190 C / Gas 5. Wash and gently scrub the quinces and lay them on the prepared baking tray. Roast for about 1-2 hours in the oven until they feel soft. The cooking time with change depending on the size and firmness of the quinces, so keep checking.
  2. Once the quinces have cooled enough for you to touch them, cut them open, remove the cores and seeds with a sharp knife. Place the quinces back onto the baking tray with the cut side facing up. Add a piece of butter to each quince and sprinkle with 1 tablespoon of sugar.
  3. Roast the quinces again for 30-60 minutes in the oven at 190 C / Gas 5 until they are very soft and have taken on a red colour. At the end you can also turn on the grill so that the sugar begins to crystallise. Serve with cream or mascarpone.

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Roast picanha with spiced quince

Helen Graves served up a stunning roast picanha recipe with some subtly spiced quince for a brilliant autumnal roast dinner. Picanha, also known as rump cap, makes a fantastic roasting cut, as the meat can be cooked to perfection in under an hour. Make sure you rest the beef before serving for optimum tenderness.

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Picanha, or rump cap, is an underused cut of beef in the UK, despite the fact that it has loads of flavour. In Brazil, it is the most prized cut, and the one you will often see skewered and sizzling over a hot grill. It’s also great as a super quick roast, however, with a 1.5kg piece of meat cooking to medium rare in just under an hour.

I’ve steered towards North Africa with the flavours here, using lots of bold spice and serving it with roasted quince, a particularly fragrant fruit that makes a lovely sweet and sour accompaniment to the meat.

The picanha is rubbed with a mixture of white and black peppercorns, bay leaves, and a combination of hot and smoky chillies including guiajillo and pasilla. The result is a spicy, highly seasoned crust, which would also work well on the barbecue.

The quince are simmered in a sugar syrup along with cinnamon, cloves and a hefty slosh of Marsala, before being baked in the oven. Together with the beef this is an unusual and impressive combination that makes a nice change from the usual roast dinner.

Don’t forget to save the shallots that cook underneath the beef, as they soak up the sticky beef fat and spices and are excellent as a side dish. In keeping with the North African/Latin American vibes it would be lovely to serve this with a pilaf, although it’s great as it is. A Californian, South African or Australian Pinot Noir alongside wouldn’t hurt one bit.


How To Cook Quince

Yield Makes about 6 cups fruit plus 2 cups syrup

  • alcohol-free
  • egg-free
  • dairy-free
  • fish-free
  • peanut-free
  • vegetarian
  • shellfish-free
  • pork-free
  • pescatarian
  • gluten-free
  • tree-nut-free
  • soy-free
  • wheat-free
  • red-meat-free
  • no-oil-added
  • Calories 290
  • Fat 0.2 g (0.3%)
  • Saturated 0.0 g (0.1%)
  • Carbs 77.2 g (25.7%)
  • Fiber 4.4 g (17.4%)
  • Sugars 42.3 g
  • Protein 1.0 g (1.9%)
  • Sodium 10.2 mg (0.4%)

Ingredients

honey (or another 1/4 cup sugar)

Optional flavorings: Large strip of lemon or orange peel, halved vanilla bean, star anise, whole cinnamon stick, cardamom pods, fresh ginger cut into coins

Equipment

Instructions

Weigh the quince: This basic formula can easily be doubled or tripled or more, depending on how much fruit you have. These proportions are for 2 pounds.

Peel the quince: The quince can be peeled easily using a regular vegetable peeler.

Cut the quince in half: Cut the fruit in half with a large, sharp chef's knife. Be sure your cutting board is secure the fruit is very tough and spongy and will be hard to cut.

Slice into quarters and cut away the core: Slice each fruit into quarters, then use your chef's knife to cut the core and seeds away. Again, this is tough, so be careful the middle of a quince is woody and hard to cut.

Slice off any wormy bits: Quince are not a widely-grown commercial crop, and much locally-grown fruit will be organic, as mine were. Expect to see some veins or spots that need to be cut away. Use a small, sharp paring knife to cut away anything that seems unappetizing.

Place cut quince into a bowl of water: As you finish with each quince quarter, place in a large bowl of water to prevent browning.

Make the poaching liquid and add any flavorings: Mix together 4 cups water, 1/2 cup sugar, and 1/4 cup honey in a 3-quart (or larger) saucepan. Add any flavorings you like I usually add a vanilla bean or, as here, star anise and whole cloves. Bring to a simmer, stirring until the sugar is dissolved.

Add the quince and cover with a parchment "lid": Slip the quince into the liquid and cover with a parchment "lid," made by cutting a round piece of parchment just large enough to cover the pan (see tips for this here). If you don't have parchment you can cover the pan loosely with a lid instead. The goal is to keep most of the liquid from evaporating while cooking the quince, but to still let it reduce a little bit into a sweet syrup. Bring to a boil then reduce the heat and cover with the parchment or a lid.

Simmer for 40 to 50 minutes: Cook at a bare simmer for 40 to 50 minutes, or until the quince is turning pink and is tender.

Refrigerate in the poaching liquid: When the quince is pink and tender, turn off the heat and either strain and use right away, or refrigerate the quince in the poaching liquid for up to 7 days.

Recipe Notes

Freezing: The quince can also be frozen, with its liquid or without.

The Syrup: Don't throw out that beautiful liquid! It's a wonderful byproduct of cooking quince. You can stir it into drinks or Champagne, or reduce it further and drizzle it over cakes or ice cream.


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Pork Roast with Quince

You can make this dish with quince jam, or any jam of your choice – I would stick to the light ones though (apricot, peach).

  • 1 Pork roast
  • 2 Tablespoons Quince jam
  • 3 Onions – cut in small pieces
  • 4 garlic cloves – chopped
  • 1 cup water
  • Sea salt – not ground
  • Cumin (if possible German cumin)
  • Pepper

  1. Rub the roast with the quince jam.
  2. Sprinkle salt, pepper, and ground cumin.
  3. Place the onions and the garlic around the roast.
  4. Add the water, cover and bake for 45 minutes in a 350ºF (180ºC) oven. Uncover, check for water, and continue backing for another 45 minutes or until roast is well done and tender.
  5. Place the roast on a cutting board. Add 1 teaspoon cornstarch previously diluted in a little bit of water to the sauce. Warm up so it thickens up a little bit. Slice the roast, and return to the pan.

Cheese Sticks

Avocado Shrimp Cocktail

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To Poach Quince

  1. Cut the quince into quarters–cutting out the core–and then cut the quince into wedges or slices or chop as befits your recipe or final use (you can leave them in quarters if you like).
  2. Put the quince in a pot with enough water to cover all of the pieces. Add 2 tablespoons of sugar for each cup of water you add. Throw in a cinnamon stick, if that sounds good, for extra flavor and if it matches your final recipe (whole cloves, cardamom pods, and allspice are other tasty spices to add that will flavor the quince nicely).
  3. Bring the liquid just to a boil, stirring a bit as it heats to help the sugar dissolve. Reduce the heat to low and gently simmer until the quince is completely tender, about an hour. If you want to eat the plain poached quince (with ice cream, for example), cook them a bit longer so they can be cut with a spoon.
  4. Let the quince and the poaching liquid cool to room temperature. Use in a recipe or store, covered and chilled, for up to a week.

Note: If you want the syrup to be a bit thicker, remove the quince and boil the syrup until it reduces about a quarter to a third and thickens a bit. You can store the quince and syrup separately, but the quince will last longer in the syrup.


Top 10 Luscious Quince Recipes For Fall

Quince is the most underrated and neglected fruit of the autumn season. But it hasn’t always been like this. In ancient Greece, for example, this fruit was associated with romance, marriage, and fertility, often given as a wedding gift to the bride. In mythology, quince is associated with Aphrodite, the goddess of love and beauty. It is believed that the golden apple given to her by Paris was actually a quince.

Also known as the fruit of love, quince is traditionally used to make delicious tarts, jellies, preserves, and desserts. However, this fruit has much more potentials. In the Middle East, it is cooked in meat stews, and the famous membrillo – the delicious quince paste – is made in Latin countries and eaten with Manchego cheese. If you were served quince paste on the cheese board, you know it already very well.

Quince season is almost here, and a great advantage of this fruit is that it will keep in the fridge for up to 2-3 months! It is sweet it has a wonderful flavor – much like a perfumed apple – it has a slightly grainy texture and a lovely rosy, amber color.

We could tell you about quince all day long it is so delicious! If you had never cooked with quince before, you must try it you will love it! Look for them at farmers’ markets, buy a few fruits and try these fantastic savory recipes!

Beef Quince Stew

Add quince to beef stew, and you will have a wonderfully comforting meal full of flavor. Perfectly creamy thick sauce, tender beef chunks, and the quinces blended into the rubied stew. Serve it with bread, rice, or eat it on its own – this meal will be the queen of your dinner parties.

Lamb-Stuffed Quince With Pomegranate & Coriander

Recipe via www.ottolenghi.co.uk

Quince is a hard fruit. Therefore, it is also perfect for filling it and baking in the oven. This nutritious and delicious dish will bring oriental flavors into your cooking. A time-saving version of this recipe if you chop the quince into small cubes and form meatballs of the stuffing. It cooks quicker this way.

Chicken With Ginger and Quince

Chicken is wonderful with many fruits, for a light and healthy meal. If you have tried whole roast chicken stuffed with apples, you know how delicious it is. This recipe uses quince, chicken breast, lemon, honey, ginger, and cinnamon pinch. Serve it on its own or with steamed rice.

Quince, Pumpkin, Eggplant, and Quinoa Salad

Try this recipe for a refreshing side dish, a light dinner, or as a main course. Quince and pumpkin are both in season during the fall, so that you can get them now at the farmer’s market. A highly nutritious dish with all the benefits of quinoa and fresh pomegranate as a garnish.

Saffron Infused Chicken With Quince

A fusion of Persian and Azerbaijani cuisines, this stew will light up the grey and rainy days. Quince and saffron are widely used in Persian cooking. Try this glorious dish to make an easy and delicious lunch or dinner.

Quince and Goat Cheese Galette

Galette is a term used in French cuisine for flat crusty cakes. They are less fussy than a traditional tart and offer more crisp crust. This recipe is a perfect sweet and savory pastry. Quince and goat cheese are such a perfect match they were meant to be eaten together.

12-hour Roast Moroccan Lamb with Quince and Couscous

As the name already tells, it is not a typical quick dinner recipe. However, this recipe is not as fussy as it sounds. The preparation is quick, and the lamb shoulder will bake in your oven for 12 hours. Roast lamb is a beautiful festive dish for a weekend dinner party.

Persian Quince Stew

Traditionally called Khoresht-e Beh, this Persian Quince Stew is another tasty oriental dish. Veal cooked with onions, yellow split peas, turmeric, cinnamon, and dried limes and at the end mixed with the golden fried quince slices. While the stew is traditionally meat-based, it can be easily made completely vegetarian by omitting the meat.

Braised Beef Cheeks with Quinces and Sweet Potatoes

Here is a dish that you can prepare one day before, and the taste will enhance! You can serve it with mashed potatoes it will look beautiful on the plate. Place a spoon of mashed potatoes and fill it with some stew sauce and few quince slices.

Duck Tagine with Quince and Apricots

Duck is another poultry that is amazing when paired with fruits. To prepare this Moroccan dish, you will need duck legs, quinces, cinnamon, ginger, coriander, and dried apricots. Perfect on its own if you want to skip carbs.


Helen Graves served up a stunning roast picanha recipe with some subtly spiced quince for a brilliant autumnal roast dinner. Picanha, also known as rump cap, makes a fantastic roasting cut, as the meat can be cooked to perfection in under an hour. Make sure you rest the beef before serving for optimum tenderness.

Picanha, or rump cap, is an underused cut of beef in the UK, despite the fact that it has loads of flavour. In Brazil, it is the most prized cut, and the one you will often see skewered and sizzling over a hot grill. It’s also great as a super quick roast, however, with a 1.5kg piece of meat cooking to medium rare in just under an hour.

I’ve steered towards North Africa with the flavours here, using lots of bold spice and serving it with roasted quince, a particularly fragrant fruit that makes a lovely sweet and sour accompaniment to the meat.

The picanha is rubbed with a mixture of white and black peppercorns, bay leaves, and a combination of hot and smoky chillies including guiajillo and pasilla. The result is a spicy, highly seasoned crust, which would also work well on the barbecue.

The quince are simmered in a sugar syrup along with cinnamon, cloves and a hefty slosh of Marsala, before being baked in the oven. Together with the beef this is an unusual and impressive combination that makes a nice change from the usual roast dinner.

Don’t forget to save the shallots that cook underneath the beef, as they soak up the sticky beef fat and spices and are excellent as a side dish. In keeping with the North African/Latin American vibes it would be lovely to serve this with a pilaf, although it’s great as it is. A Californian, South African or Australian Pinot Noir alongside wouldn’t hurt one bit.


Maple roasted quince and brussels sprout salad

This maple roasted quince and Brussels sprout salad recipe with lemony dressing and crumbled goat cheese makes for a wonderfully autumnal side dish. Jump to recipe.

I’ve spent the past couple weeks wrestling recipes. My kitchen has been the scene of dry pie crusts, rubbery custards, and ho-hum chicken. However disappointing, these are the reasons we test recipes. They develop and evolve, and each iteration is an improvement. It took some work, but in each case I eventually finished with something I really love and can’t wait to share.

The unexpected twists and turns of recipe development combined with photography-unfriendly storm clouds threw my weekly posting schedule off. I needed something good, pretty much immediately. Something that didn’t need to be worked and reworked. As it often does, inspiration came from ingredients – the season’s first batch of Brussels sprouts and an unexpected basket of quince at the grocery store.

Crisp edged, smoky roasted Brussels sprouts are one of my favorite seasonal flavors, but variations in size and the presence of loose leaves on the roasting pan often lead to sprouts both soggy and burned. It can feel like one needs just the right alchemy to get these little brassicas right. This roasted Brussels sprouts recipe solves both problems beautifully and with surprising ease. Sprout leaves are separated out, while the dense, pale interior is sliced thin. Sliced sprouts are roasted first, while the leaves are roasted briefly right at the end. A little added prep time and complexity makes for perfectly cooked sprouts – the slices are tender with golden edges, while the leaves crisp up into perfect little Brussels sprout chips, lending a satisfying crunch to the salad.

Supporting the sprouts are maple roasted quince slices – buttery and tart – plus a lemony dressing and crumbled Capricho de Cabra goat cheese. This is a special salad and a fitting reward for such carefully prepared ingredients.

If you have a large, reliable oven, you can probably roast the quince and sprouts at the same time. My oven is more temperamental and I’ve written the recipe with that in mind.


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Great taste! I couldn't find quinces (made this in March), so I subbed dried apricots. The flavor was great, but the apricots turned to mush by the end of cooking. Next time I would add them in the last hour of cooking. I also might try subbing some unripe pears. I used beef broth instead of chicken and my dish did have the dark color like the picture. Served with toasted couscous.

I thought this was excellent. Made it exactly as written, using 100% pure pomegranate juice. Served over polenta with plenty of chopped mint. I thought the pairing of pork & quince was inspired and the flavors deep and complex. I agree with previous reviewers that it doesn't look anything like the picture. Much paler in color.

i love to cook, and have no problem spending a great deal of time on a dish, just like the reviewer before me. but i have to completely agree w everything she said. it was just ok. i made it for a dinner party, and it looked NOTHING like the picture. not worth my time. i will also agree though that it had great potential, and the spice rub is something i will most definitely use again.

I should preface my review by saying that I absolutely love cooking, and I don't mind spending large amounts of time making something special. Unfortunately, this one just did not deliver. The end result was not worth the amount of time it required. Yes, it was good, but simply not worth it. Don't be tempted by the luscious-looking picture in the mag - it won't even come close to resembling that!

I'm not sure there is an appropriate number of forks to give for my experience. This recipe had a lot of potential. Things started off well. The rub was tasty, the pork was very tender and flavorful. Things took a turn south when I took the pork out on the third day to slice and reheat. I was going to use the foil that I had used in the oven and the refrigerator to cover the meat for reheating. To my horror, I noticed that the places where the foil had been in contact with the meat, it had been eaten away! I know you're supposed to be careful with tomatoes and foil, but I didn't think meat with a spice rub was a problem. I wrap my spice rubbed baby back ribs in foil all the time. Could it have been the fruit or pomegranate juice? I'm a little paranoid about serving bad food, so I'm about to throw out the whole roast. The idea of melted bits of foil in my food does not appeal to me. Aside from that, the other very minor negative is that my version did not turn out looking as deep and rich in color as the photograph. It was more of a "pot roast light brown". If anyone can shed some light on my foil issue, Iɽ appreciate it!

Oh my, this was good. I made this for my own rehearsal dinner as I knew I could do the bulk of the work several days in advance. Came out beautifully to many ohs and ahs. The flavors of the spices with the pomegranate juice and the quince were sublime. One thing I found though was I wasn't left with much sauce before cutting and reheating. I added some home-made chicken stock and just didn't cook it down too much and it came out beautifully. Use real pomegranate juice (there are many kinds out there with mostly grape or apple juice in them- would be too sweet). I served this with the minted saffron rice recipe from this site and Ina Garten's (the barefoot contessa) apple crisp for dessert- heavenly!


Watch the video: Turkish Chicken Recipe.. دجاج على الطريقه التركيه (August 2022).