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There's Also a Nail Polish to Pair With Your Wine

There's Also a Nail Polish to Pair With Your Wine

Wine company debuts nail polish colors to match their offerings

An Italian winemaker has paired with Beauty Bar to offer wine-colored nail polishes.

Why not pair a wine-colored nail polish with your dress made of red wine or perfume? If you're not keen to wear your wine on your sleeve (literally), one wine company is offering a more reasonable way to wear your favorite grape.

Italian winemaker Santa Margherita has created four nail polish shades to match their own offerings: Pinot Grigio, Prosecco, Sparkling Rosé, and Chianti wines. The limited-edition polishes will be sold at Beauty Bar events across the country, where you can drink a glass of the paired polish and wine. Santa Margherita also has a Facebook promotion that invites followers to describe what "wine personality" fits them to win a sample pack of the polishes.

SheKnows breaks down the colors, and they're pretty inviting: a light, glittery pink for its Rosé, and a and a shimmering gold for its prosecco.


The impact of co-inoculation with Oenococcus oeni on the trancriptome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and on the flavour-active metabolite profiles during fermentation in synthetic must

Co-inoculation of commercial yeast strains with a bacterial starter culture at the beginning of fermentation of certain varietal grape juices is rapidly becoming a preferred option in the global wine industry, and frequently replaces the previously dominant sequential inoculation strategy where bacterial strains, responsible for malolactic fermentation, are inoculated after alcoholic fermentation has been completed. However, while several studies have highlighted potential advantages of co-inoculation, such studies have mainly focused on broad fermentation properties of the mixed cultures, and no data exist regarding the impact of this strategy on many oenologically relevant attributes of specific wine yeast strains such as aroma production. Here we investigate the impact of co-inoculation on a commercial yeast strain during alcoholic fermentation by comparing the transcriptome of this strain in yeast-only and in co-inoculated fermentations of synthetic must. The data show that a significant number of genes are differentially expressed in this strain in these two conditions. Some of the differentially expressed genes appear to respond to chemical changes in the fermenting must that are linked to bacterial metabolic activities, whereas others might represent a direct response of the yeast to the presence of a competing organism.

Highlights

► Co-inoculation is a novel and popular strategy in industrial wine fermentations. ► No information regarding the molecular impact on yeast are available. ► Yeast only- and co-inoculation are compared. ► Metabolic and yeast transcriptomic responses are assessed. ► Yeast responds by changes in aroma production and gene regulation.


The impact of co-inoculation with Oenococcus oeni on the trancriptome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and on the flavour-active metabolite profiles during fermentation in synthetic must

Co-inoculation of commercial yeast strains with a bacterial starter culture at the beginning of fermentation of certain varietal grape juices is rapidly becoming a preferred option in the global wine industry, and frequently replaces the previously dominant sequential inoculation strategy where bacterial strains, responsible for malolactic fermentation, are inoculated after alcoholic fermentation has been completed. However, while several studies have highlighted potential advantages of co-inoculation, such studies have mainly focused on broad fermentation properties of the mixed cultures, and no data exist regarding the impact of this strategy on many oenologically relevant attributes of specific wine yeast strains such as aroma production. Here we investigate the impact of co-inoculation on a commercial yeast strain during alcoholic fermentation by comparing the transcriptome of this strain in yeast-only and in co-inoculated fermentations of synthetic must. The data show that a significant number of genes are differentially expressed in this strain in these two conditions. Some of the differentially expressed genes appear to respond to chemical changes in the fermenting must that are linked to bacterial metabolic activities, whereas others might represent a direct response of the yeast to the presence of a competing organism.

Highlights

► Co-inoculation is a novel and popular strategy in industrial wine fermentations. ► No information regarding the molecular impact on yeast are available. ► Yeast only- and co-inoculation are compared. ► Metabolic and yeast transcriptomic responses are assessed. ► Yeast responds by changes in aroma production and gene regulation.


The impact of co-inoculation with Oenococcus oeni on the trancriptome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and on the flavour-active metabolite profiles during fermentation in synthetic must

Co-inoculation of commercial yeast strains with a bacterial starter culture at the beginning of fermentation of certain varietal grape juices is rapidly becoming a preferred option in the global wine industry, and frequently replaces the previously dominant sequential inoculation strategy where bacterial strains, responsible for malolactic fermentation, are inoculated after alcoholic fermentation has been completed. However, while several studies have highlighted potential advantages of co-inoculation, such studies have mainly focused on broad fermentation properties of the mixed cultures, and no data exist regarding the impact of this strategy on many oenologically relevant attributes of specific wine yeast strains such as aroma production. Here we investigate the impact of co-inoculation on a commercial yeast strain during alcoholic fermentation by comparing the transcriptome of this strain in yeast-only and in co-inoculated fermentations of synthetic must. The data show that a significant number of genes are differentially expressed in this strain in these two conditions. Some of the differentially expressed genes appear to respond to chemical changes in the fermenting must that are linked to bacterial metabolic activities, whereas others might represent a direct response of the yeast to the presence of a competing organism.

Highlights

► Co-inoculation is a novel and popular strategy in industrial wine fermentations. ► No information regarding the molecular impact on yeast are available. ► Yeast only- and co-inoculation are compared. ► Metabolic and yeast transcriptomic responses are assessed. ► Yeast responds by changes in aroma production and gene regulation.


The impact of co-inoculation with Oenococcus oeni on the trancriptome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and on the flavour-active metabolite profiles during fermentation in synthetic must

Co-inoculation of commercial yeast strains with a bacterial starter culture at the beginning of fermentation of certain varietal grape juices is rapidly becoming a preferred option in the global wine industry, and frequently replaces the previously dominant sequential inoculation strategy where bacterial strains, responsible for malolactic fermentation, are inoculated after alcoholic fermentation has been completed. However, while several studies have highlighted potential advantages of co-inoculation, such studies have mainly focused on broad fermentation properties of the mixed cultures, and no data exist regarding the impact of this strategy on many oenologically relevant attributes of specific wine yeast strains such as aroma production. Here we investigate the impact of co-inoculation on a commercial yeast strain during alcoholic fermentation by comparing the transcriptome of this strain in yeast-only and in co-inoculated fermentations of synthetic must. The data show that a significant number of genes are differentially expressed in this strain in these two conditions. Some of the differentially expressed genes appear to respond to chemical changes in the fermenting must that are linked to bacterial metabolic activities, whereas others might represent a direct response of the yeast to the presence of a competing organism.

Highlights

► Co-inoculation is a novel and popular strategy in industrial wine fermentations. ► No information regarding the molecular impact on yeast are available. ► Yeast only- and co-inoculation are compared. ► Metabolic and yeast transcriptomic responses are assessed. ► Yeast responds by changes in aroma production and gene regulation.


The impact of co-inoculation with Oenococcus oeni on the trancriptome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and on the flavour-active metabolite profiles during fermentation in synthetic must

Co-inoculation of commercial yeast strains with a bacterial starter culture at the beginning of fermentation of certain varietal grape juices is rapidly becoming a preferred option in the global wine industry, and frequently replaces the previously dominant sequential inoculation strategy where bacterial strains, responsible for malolactic fermentation, are inoculated after alcoholic fermentation has been completed. However, while several studies have highlighted potential advantages of co-inoculation, such studies have mainly focused on broad fermentation properties of the mixed cultures, and no data exist regarding the impact of this strategy on many oenologically relevant attributes of specific wine yeast strains such as aroma production. Here we investigate the impact of co-inoculation on a commercial yeast strain during alcoholic fermentation by comparing the transcriptome of this strain in yeast-only and in co-inoculated fermentations of synthetic must. The data show that a significant number of genes are differentially expressed in this strain in these two conditions. Some of the differentially expressed genes appear to respond to chemical changes in the fermenting must that are linked to bacterial metabolic activities, whereas others might represent a direct response of the yeast to the presence of a competing organism.

Highlights

► Co-inoculation is a novel and popular strategy in industrial wine fermentations. ► No information regarding the molecular impact on yeast are available. ► Yeast only- and co-inoculation are compared. ► Metabolic and yeast transcriptomic responses are assessed. ► Yeast responds by changes in aroma production and gene regulation.


The impact of co-inoculation with Oenococcus oeni on the trancriptome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and on the flavour-active metabolite profiles during fermentation in synthetic must

Co-inoculation of commercial yeast strains with a bacterial starter culture at the beginning of fermentation of certain varietal grape juices is rapidly becoming a preferred option in the global wine industry, and frequently replaces the previously dominant sequential inoculation strategy where bacterial strains, responsible for malolactic fermentation, are inoculated after alcoholic fermentation has been completed. However, while several studies have highlighted potential advantages of co-inoculation, such studies have mainly focused on broad fermentation properties of the mixed cultures, and no data exist regarding the impact of this strategy on many oenologically relevant attributes of specific wine yeast strains such as aroma production. Here we investigate the impact of co-inoculation on a commercial yeast strain during alcoholic fermentation by comparing the transcriptome of this strain in yeast-only and in co-inoculated fermentations of synthetic must. The data show that a significant number of genes are differentially expressed in this strain in these two conditions. Some of the differentially expressed genes appear to respond to chemical changes in the fermenting must that are linked to bacterial metabolic activities, whereas others might represent a direct response of the yeast to the presence of a competing organism.

Highlights

► Co-inoculation is a novel and popular strategy in industrial wine fermentations. ► No information regarding the molecular impact on yeast are available. ► Yeast only- and co-inoculation are compared. ► Metabolic and yeast transcriptomic responses are assessed. ► Yeast responds by changes in aroma production and gene regulation.


The impact of co-inoculation with Oenococcus oeni on the trancriptome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and on the flavour-active metabolite profiles during fermentation in synthetic must

Co-inoculation of commercial yeast strains with a bacterial starter culture at the beginning of fermentation of certain varietal grape juices is rapidly becoming a preferred option in the global wine industry, and frequently replaces the previously dominant sequential inoculation strategy where bacterial strains, responsible for malolactic fermentation, are inoculated after alcoholic fermentation has been completed. However, while several studies have highlighted potential advantages of co-inoculation, such studies have mainly focused on broad fermentation properties of the mixed cultures, and no data exist regarding the impact of this strategy on many oenologically relevant attributes of specific wine yeast strains such as aroma production. Here we investigate the impact of co-inoculation on a commercial yeast strain during alcoholic fermentation by comparing the transcriptome of this strain in yeast-only and in co-inoculated fermentations of synthetic must. The data show that a significant number of genes are differentially expressed in this strain in these two conditions. Some of the differentially expressed genes appear to respond to chemical changes in the fermenting must that are linked to bacterial metabolic activities, whereas others might represent a direct response of the yeast to the presence of a competing organism.

Highlights

► Co-inoculation is a novel and popular strategy in industrial wine fermentations. ► No information regarding the molecular impact on yeast are available. ► Yeast only- and co-inoculation are compared. ► Metabolic and yeast transcriptomic responses are assessed. ► Yeast responds by changes in aroma production and gene regulation.


The impact of co-inoculation with Oenococcus oeni on the trancriptome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and on the flavour-active metabolite profiles during fermentation in synthetic must

Co-inoculation of commercial yeast strains with a bacterial starter culture at the beginning of fermentation of certain varietal grape juices is rapidly becoming a preferred option in the global wine industry, and frequently replaces the previously dominant sequential inoculation strategy where bacterial strains, responsible for malolactic fermentation, are inoculated after alcoholic fermentation has been completed. However, while several studies have highlighted potential advantages of co-inoculation, such studies have mainly focused on broad fermentation properties of the mixed cultures, and no data exist regarding the impact of this strategy on many oenologically relevant attributes of specific wine yeast strains such as aroma production. Here we investigate the impact of co-inoculation on a commercial yeast strain during alcoholic fermentation by comparing the transcriptome of this strain in yeast-only and in co-inoculated fermentations of synthetic must. The data show that a significant number of genes are differentially expressed in this strain in these two conditions. Some of the differentially expressed genes appear to respond to chemical changes in the fermenting must that are linked to bacterial metabolic activities, whereas others might represent a direct response of the yeast to the presence of a competing organism.

Highlights

► Co-inoculation is a novel and popular strategy in industrial wine fermentations. ► No information regarding the molecular impact on yeast are available. ► Yeast only- and co-inoculation are compared. ► Metabolic and yeast transcriptomic responses are assessed. ► Yeast responds by changes in aroma production and gene regulation.


The impact of co-inoculation with Oenococcus oeni on the trancriptome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and on the flavour-active metabolite profiles during fermentation in synthetic must

Co-inoculation of commercial yeast strains with a bacterial starter culture at the beginning of fermentation of certain varietal grape juices is rapidly becoming a preferred option in the global wine industry, and frequently replaces the previously dominant sequential inoculation strategy where bacterial strains, responsible for malolactic fermentation, are inoculated after alcoholic fermentation has been completed. However, while several studies have highlighted potential advantages of co-inoculation, such studies have mainly focused on broad fermentation properties of the mixed cultures, and no data exist regarding the impact of this strategy on many oenologically relevant attributes of specific wine yeast strains such as aroma production. Here we investigate the impact of co-inoculation on a commercial yeast strain during alcoholic fermentation by comparing the transcriptome of this strain in yeast-only and in co-inoculated fermentations of synthetic must. The data show that a significant number of genes are differentially expressed in this strain in these two conditions. Some of the differentially expressed genes appear to respond to chemical changes in the fermenting must that are linked to bacterial metabolic activities, whereas others might represent a direct response of the yeast to the presence of a competing organism.

Highlights

► Co-inoculation is a novel and popular strategy in industrial wine fermentations. ► No information regarding the molecular impact on yeast are available. ► Yeast only- and co-inoculation are compared. ► Metabolic and yeast transcriptomic responses are assessed. ► Yeast responds by changes in aroma production and gene regulation.


The impact of co-inoculation with Oenococcus oeni on the trancriptome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and on the flavour-active metabolite profiles during fermentation in synthetic must

Co-inoculation of commercial yeast strains with a bacterial starter culture at the beginning of fermentation of certain varietal grape juices is rapidly becoming a preferred option in the global wine industry, and frequently replaces the previously dominant sequential inoculation strategy where bacterial strains, responsible for malolactic fermentation, are inoculated after alcoholic fermentation has been completed. However, while several studies have highlighted potential advantages of co-inoculation, such studies have mainly focused on broad fermentation properties of the mixed cultures, and no data exist regarding the impact of this strategy on many oenologically relevant attributes of specific wine yeast strains such as aroma production. Here we investigate the impact of co-inoculation on a commercial yeast strain during alcoholic fermentation by comparing the transcriptome of this strain in yeast-only and in co-inoculated fermentations of synthetic must. The data show that a significant number of genes are differentially expressed in this strain in these two conditions. Some of the differentially expressed genes appear to respond to chemical changes in the fermenting must that are linked to bacterial metabolic activities, whereas others might represent a direct response of the yeast to the presence of a competing organism.

Highlights

► Co-inoculation is a novel and popular strategy in industrial wine fermentations. ► No information regarding the molecular impact on yeast are available. ► Yeast only- and co-inoculation are compared. ► Metabolic and yeast transcriptomic responses are assessed. ► Yeast responds by changes in aroma production and gene regulation.


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