Natural Energy Boosters


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Instead of reaching for that daily morning and afternoon coffee, try incorporating some of these practices into your diet to see a more consistent change in your energy levels. Nutritionist Kelly Aronica breaks down the science for us and shares some foods and tips for a more energetic and lively lifestyle. — Yasmin Fahr

The Science Behind It

Food is fuel, so eating a healthy diet provides your body with the fuel it needs to function at its peak. It’s also important to refuel every few hours to keep you from running out of gas. Why? Because energy levels and alertness are related to two main things: blood sugar levels and brain chemicals.

The food you eat is converted into glucose (blood sugar). Glucose is transported to all the cells in your body, where it is converted into energy. When you are not eating, your body is using its glucose storage to maintain blood sugar levels at a constant level.

After a few hours (depending on how active you are and how big your last meal was), your body starts converting fat, and some protein, into glucose. But this extra step takes a little longer and is not as efficient. So your blood sugar will drop and leave you feeling sluggish and irritable. Time to refuel!

Sugar Highs: Fact or Fiction?

Many people have the idea that sugar causes hyperactivity. But research shows that sugar actually does the opposite. While there may be a very short-lived rise in blood sugar, it is very quickly metabolized and then leads to a drop in blood sugar and fatigue. So if you want to keep alert, avoid

the sweets. Choose high-fiber carbohydrates, protein, fruits, and vegetables for your meals and snacks and save sweets for special occasions.

The brain is especially sensitive to blood sugar fluctuations. Brain chemicals that control mood and energy levels, such as dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin, are also affected by food. To maximize brain alertness, the best combination is to eat protein, which provides the raw materials for the neurotransmitters, with a smaller amount of whole grain carbohydrates. It generally takes about an hour after a meal for neurotransmitter levels to be affected.

For the specific foods that you should eat and some general ones as well, check out this slideshow to learn more.

In general, food does not work like caffeine or other stimulants. If you are lethargic because you haven’t eaten for five hours, then eating something will perk you up. But the reverse can also happen. If you eat too large a meal, the excess calories will make you sleepy.


15 Foods and Drinks That Naturally Boost Energy

When you need an energy boost, skip the soda and the sugary candies. They'll only lead you down the road to a sugar crash. These natural, health-boosting foods and drinks will help get you back to a focused (and productive!) state.

Consuming water is the easiest and most natural way to boost energy. It seems so simple, but most of us don't get enough. Dehydration can drain your energy, alter your mood, and slow your metabolism down. If you find plain water too boring, add lemon, lime, or cucumber for some extra flavor.

Known as the super greens, kale, spinach, chard, and watercress are loaded with vitamins A, C, E, and K, and are all low in calories and high in fiber. Leafy greens are also packed with magnesium, potassium, folate, and calcium, which all help brain function, maintain healthy bones, and manage blood pressure.

Add the super greens to your diet with these amazing, energy-packed recipes:

This cruciferous vegetable is high in vitamin C (1/2 cup gives you 80 percent of your recommended daily intake), fiber, iron, beta-carotene, and antioxidants. Also, our green friend contains chromium, which helps regulate blood sugar, keeping energy levels steady. To make sure you get all of those super benefits, only lightly cook broccoli (i.e. steam it for 5 minutes) or eat it raw.

Don't give in to carb hating. Your body needs carbohydrates for fuel and a serotonin boost. The key is to eat smart carbs that are whole grains, which provide a slow and steady release of fuel to keep your energy level consistent and balanced. Quinoa, which is actually a seed, is packed with protein, contains all nine essential amino acids, provides a massive 118 mg of magnesium per serving, and is quick and simple to cook.

Hungry now? Try these nutritious quinoa recipes to prevent an energy crash:

On salads, baked into bread, or just on their own, walnuts are a true superfood. The amino acids found in this healthy snack help improve blood flow to muscles to combat any slugglish feelings. The nuts contain oleic acid, which can reduce depression, and are packed with filling and energizing fiber, omega-3s, copper, manganese, and vitamin E. The nuts may even give your brain a boost and help slow the onset of Alzheimer&rsquos and Parkinson&rsquos disease.

The blue color of this tasty fruit is caused by a group of flavonoids called anthocyanins, which are high-powered antioxidants. Blueberries offer disease-fighting phytochemicals, are super-high in vitamin C, and provide fiber, which helps regulate blood-sugar levels. Although they are delicious on their own, you can take blueberries to the next level with this Blueberry-Melon Salad With Thyme Syrup.

As the most common go-to solution for a quick pick-me-up, coffee sometimes gets a bum rap. But when consumed in moderation, coffee actually has some health benefits. A cup of joe has been shown to help reduce the risk of Alzheimer&rsquos disease, depression, Type 2 Diabetes, and jump-start the metabolism. But it is recommended that you keep your java habit limited to just three 5-ounce cups per day.

Dairy-free dark chocolate is the delicious sweet treat you need to break an energy rut. It gives you a slight boost, and its phenylethylamine encourages your brain to release endorphins and put you in a better mood. Chocolate also has flavonoids, which help fight off the not-so-good LDL cholesterol and increase the blood flow to your brain. That should help make you more alert.

Slurp them up! Low-fat and high in protein, six medium oysters contain 31 percent of your daily required intake of iron, 272 percent of your daily need for vitamin B12, and a whopping 509 percent of your daily need of zinc. If that's not enough, those bites are high in omega-3 fatty acids and can help maintain healthy brain function. And you may just need the energy boost all of those good-for-you vitamins and minerals provide since oysters are, ahem, an aphrodisiac.

Indulge in oyster goodness with these recipes:

With a green that's this high in magnesium (half a cup has 78 mg) and folate, rich in calcium, and bursting with vitamins A and B, it's no wonder Popeye was able to stay so strong on his spinach diet. This leafy green helps prevent inflammation, can lower the risk of heart disease, and has more iron than any other green vegetable. And that iron is key to helping you keep your energy level high. Combine spinach with vitamin C-rich foods, like oranges and lemons, to more effectively absorb the iron.

Try this tasty, vitamin-filledCitrusy Spinach and Salmon Salad for a quick energy boost.

This plant-based food is a high-protein alternative to high-fat, high cholesterol meat. Beans have a low glycemic index, which helps stabilize the energy they provide. Kidney and black beans are high in magnesium (70mg and 120mg for every 1 cup, respectively). Red beans are particularly high in antioxidants and iron. Eating a serving can help keep sluggishness at bay.

Beans are a healthy addition to Minestrone Soup or Vegetable Hash. To spice things up try this legume-loving Habichuelas Coloradas Grandes (Island Red Beans) recipe.

Chi-Chi-Chi-Chia! The name may make you think of the plant-based pet you had in the 80s, but there's more to chia than just a catchy advertising tune. Those grass-producing seeds have actually been a healthy diet staple for people since the people of the Aztec civilization roamed the Earth, and for good reason. Chia seeds are loaded with omega-3 fatty acids, fiber, manganese, phosphorus (for healthy teeth and bones!), and protein. All of these wonderful traits help stabilize blood sugar, keep energy levels high, fill you up, and may even reduce cholesterol. If that's not enough, chia seeds contain skin-saving radicals that help your complexion glow year round.

New to chia seeds? Try sprinkling them over a cup of low-fat yogurt or mixing the seeds into your morning oatmeal for a fueled-up breakfast. Or discover their nutty flavor by stirring chia seeds into this incredible lentil dish.

While it does have caffeine, green tea boosts your energy without the jitters that can come after consuming other more highly caffeinated beverages. The aromatic drink is loaded with an amino acid called L-theanine, and it offers a long list of health benefits. It may even lower your risk of heart disease, Parkinson's disease, and cancer.

Just a handful of these delicious nuts can fill you up and give you the energy boost you need. They're high in protein, magnesium, and fiber. Keep a stash of these affordable nuts in your purse so you can grab a few when you need them. Don't let their fat content scare you away. Almonds have mostly monounsaturated fats &mdash the good kind &mdash which contribute to a reduction in cholesterol.

Cucumbers are mostly enzyme-filled water (about 96 percent) and contain vitamins A, B and C, zinc, iron, folic acid, calcium, magnesium, and potassium. All of this nutritional love can give you a quick pick-me-up without overloading the calories. Plus, cucumbers are great for the complexion because of their silica content, which boosts skin's moisture and elasticity.


15 Foods and Drinks That Naturally Boost Energy

When you need an energy boost, skip the soda and the sugary candies. They'll only lead you down the road to a sugar crash. These natural, health-boosting foods and drinks will help get you back to a focused (and productive!) state.

Consuming water is the easiest and most natural way to boost energy. It seems so simple, but most of us don't get enough. Dehydration can drain your energy, alter your mood, and slow your metabolism down. If you find plain water too boring, add lemon, lime, or cucumber for some extra flavor.

Known as the super greens, kale, spinach, chard, and watercress are loaded with vitamins A, C, E, and K, and are all low in calories and high in fiber. Leafy greens are also packed with magnesium, potassium, folate, and calcium, which all help brain function, maintain healthy bones, and manage blood pressure.

Add the super greens to your diet with these amazing, energy-packed recipes:

This cruciferous vegetable is high in vitamin C (1/2 cup gives you 80 percent of your recommended daily intake), fiber, iron, beta-carotene, and antioxidants. Also, our green friend contains chromium, which helps regulate blood sugar, keeping energy levels steady. To make sure you get all of those super benefits, only lightly cook broccoli (i.e. steam it for 5 minutes) or eat it raw.

Don't give in to carb hating. Your body needs carbohydrates for fuel and a serotonin boost. The key is to eat smart carbs that are whole grains, which provide a slow and steady release of fuel to keep your energy level consistent and balanced. Quinoa, which is actually a seed, is packed with protein, contains all nine essential amino acids, provides a massive 118 mg of magnesium per serving, and is quick and simple to cook.

Hungry now? Try these nutritious quinoa recipes to prevent an energy crash:

On salads, baked into bread, or just on their own, walnuts are a true superfood. The amino acids found in this healthy snack help improve blood flow to muscles to combat any slugglish feelings. The nuts contain oleic acid, which can reduce depression, and are packed with filling and energizing fiber, omega-3s, copper, manganese, and vitamin E. The nuts may even give your brain a boost and help slow the onset of Alzheimer&rsquos and Parkinson&rsquos disease.

The blue color of this tasty fruit is caused by a group of flavonoids called anthocyanins, which are high-powered antioxidants. Blueberries offer disease-fighting phytochemicals, are super-high in vitamin C, and provide fiber, which helps regulate blood-sugar levels. Although they are delicious on their own, you can take blueberries to the next level with this Blueberry-Melon Salad With Thyme Syrup.

As the most common go-to solution for a quick pick-me-up, coffee sometimes gets a bum rap. But when consumed in moderation, coffee actually has some health benefits. A cup of joe has been shown to help reduce the risk of Alzheimer&rsquos disease, depression, Type 2 Diabetes, and jump-start the metabolism. But it is recommended that you keep your java habit limited to just three 5-ounce cups per day.

Dairy-free dark chocolate is the delicious sweet treat you need to break an energy rut. It gives you a slight boost, and its phenylethylamine encourages your brain to release endorphins and put you in a better mood. Chocolate also has flavonoids, which help fight off the not-so-good LDL cholesterol and increase the blood flow to your brain. That should help make you more alert.

Slurp them up! Low-fat and high in protein, six medium oysters contain 31 percent of your daily required intake of iron, 272 percent of your daily need for vitamin B12, and a whopping 509 percent of your daily need of zinc. If that's not enough, those bites are high in omega-3 fatty acids and can help maintain healthy brain function. And you may just need the energy boost all of those good-for-you vitamins and minerals provide since oysters are, ahem, an aphrodisiac.

Indulge in oyster goodness with these recipes:

With a green that's this high in magnesium (half a cup has 78 mg) and folate, rich in calcium, and bursting with vitamins A and B, it's no wonder Popeye was able to stay so strong on his spinach diet. This leafy green helps prevent inflammation, can lower the risk of heart disease, and has more iron than any other green vegetable. And that iron is key to helping you keep your energy level high. Combine spinach with vitamin C-rich foods, like oranges and lemons, to more effectively absorb the iron.

Try this tasty, vitamin-filledCitrusy Spinach and Salmon Salad for a quick energy boost.

This plant-based food is a high-protein alternative to high-fat, high cholesterol meat. Beans have a low glycemic index, which helps stabilize the energy they provide. Kidney and black beans are high in magnesium (70mg and 120mg for every 1 cup, respectively). Red beans are particularly high in antioxidants and iron. Eating a serving can help keep sluggishness at bay.

Beans are a healthy addition to Minestrone Soup or Vegetable Hash. To spice things up try this legume-loving Habichuelas Coloradas Grandes (Island Red Beans) recipe.

Chi-Chi-Chi-Chia! The name may make you think of the plant-based pet you had in the 80s, but there's more to chia than just a catchy advertising tune. Those grass-producing seeds have actually been a healthy diet staple for people since the people of the Aztec civilization roamed the Earth, and for good reason. Chia seeds are loaded with omega-3 fatty acids, fiber, manganese, phosphorus (for healthy teeth and bones!), and protein. All of these wonderful traits help stabilize blood sugar, keep energy levels high, fill you up, and may even reduce cholesterol. If that's not enough, chia seeds contain skin-saving radicals that help your complexion glow year round.

New to chia seeds? Try sprinkling them over a cup of low-fat yogurt or mixing the seeds into your morning oatmeal for a fueled-up breakfast. Or discover their nutty flavor by stirring chia seeds into this incredible lentil dish.

While it does have caffeine, green tea boosts your energy without the jitters that can come after consuming other more highly caffeinated beverages. The aromatic drink is loaded with an amino acid called L-theanine, and it offers a long list of health benefits. It may even lower your risk of heart disease, Parkinson's disease, and cancer.

Just a handful of these delicious nuts can fill you up and give you the energy boost you need. They're high in protein, magnesium, and fiber. Keep a stash of these affordable nuts in your purse so you can grab a few when you need them. Don't let their fat content scare you away. Almonds have mostly monounsaturated fats &mdash the good kind &mdash which contribute to a reduction in cholesterol.

Cucumbers are mostly enzyme-filled water (about 96 percent) and contain vitamins A, B and C, zinc, iron, folic acid, calcium, magnesium, and potassium. All of this nutritional love can give you a quick pick-me-up without overloading the calories. Plus, cucumbers are great for the complexion because of their silica content, which boosts skin's moisture and elasticity.


15 Foods and Drinks That Naturally Boost Energy

When you need an energy boost, skip the soda and the sugary candies. They'll only lead you down the road to a sugar crash. These natural, health-boosting foods and drinks will help get you back to a focused (and productive!) state.

Consuming water is the easiest and most natural way to boost energy. It seems so simple, but most of us don't get enough. Dehydration can drain your energy, alter your mood, and slow your metabolism down. If you find plain water too boring, add lemon, lime, or cucumber for some extra flavor.

Known as the super greens, kale, spinach, chard, and watercress are loaded with vitamins A, C, E, and K, and are all low in calories and high in fiber. Leafy greens are also packed with magnesium, potassium, folate, and calcium, which all help brain function, maintain healthy bones, and manage blood pressure.

Add the super greens to your diet with these amazing, energy-packed recipes:

This cruciferous vegetable is high in vitamin C (1/2 cup gives you 80 percent of your recommended daily intake), fiber, iron, beta-carotene, and antioxidants. Also, our green friend contains chromium, which helps regulate blood sugar, keeping energy levels steady. To make sure you get all of those super benefits, only lightly cook broccoli (i.e. steam it for 5 minutes) or eat it raw.

Don't give in to carb hating. Your body needs carbohydrates for fuel and a serotonin boost. The key is to eat smart carbs that are whole grains, which provide a slow and steady release of fuel to keep your energy level consistent and balanced. Quinoa, which is actually a seed, is packed with protein, contains all nine essential amino acids, provides a massive 118 mg of magnesium per serving, and is quick and simple to cook.

Hungry now? Try these nutritious quinoa recipes to prevent an energy crash:

On salads, baked into bread, or just on their own, walnuts are a true superfood. The amino acids found in this healthy snack help improve blood flow to muscles to combat any slugglish feelings. The nuts contain oleic acid, which can reduce depression, and are packed with filling and energizing fiber, omega-3s, copper, manganese, and vitamin E. The nuts may even give your brain a boost and help slow the onset of Alzheimer&rsquos and Parkinson&rsquos disease.

The blue color of this tasty fruit is caused by a group of flavonoids called anthocyanins, which are high-powered antioxidants. Blueberries offer disease-fighting phytochemicals, are super-high in vitamin C, and provide fiber, which helps regulate blood-sugar levels. Although they are delicious on their own, you can take blueberries to the next level with this Blueberry-Melon Salad With Thyme Syrup.

As the most common go-to solution for a quick pick-me-up, coffee sometimes gets a bum rap. But when consumed in moderation, coffee actually has some health benefits. A cup of joe has been shown to help reduce the risk of Alzheimer&rsquos disease, depression, Type 2 Diabetes, and jump-start the metabolism. But it is recommended that you keep your java habit limited to just three 5-ounce cups per day.

Dairy-free dark chocolate is the delicious sweet treat you need to break an energy rut. It gives you a slight boost, and its phenylethylamine encourages your brain to release endorphins and put you in a better mood. Chocolate also has flavonoids, which help fight off the not-so-good LDL cholesterol and increase the blood flow to your brain. That should help make you more alert.

Slurp them up! Low-fat and high in protein, six medium oysters contain 31 percent of your daily required intake of iron, 272 percent of your daily need for vitamin B12, and a whopping 509 percent of your daily need of zinc. If that's not enough, those bites are high in omega-3 fatty acids and can help maintain healthy brain function. And you may just need the energy boost all of those good-for-you vitamins and minerals provide since oysters are, ahem, an aphrodisiac.

Indulge in oyster goodness with these recipes:

With a green that's this high in magnesium (half a cup has 78 mg) and folate, rich in calcium, and bursting with vitamins A and B, it's no wonder Popeye was able to stay so strong on his spinach diet. This leafy green helps prevent inflammation, can lower the risk of heart disease, and has more iron than any other green vegetable. And that iron is key to helping you keep your energy level high. Combine spinach with vitamin C-rich foods, like oranges and lemons, to more effectively absorb the iron.

Try this tasty, vitamin-filledCitrusy Spinach and Salmon Salad for a quick energy boost.

This plant-based food is a high-protein alternative to high-fat, high cholesterol meat. Beans have a low glycemic index, which helps stabilize the energy they provide. Kidney and black beans are high in magnesium (70mg and 120mg for every 1 cup, respectively). Red beans are particularly high in antioxidants and iron. Eating a serving can help keep sluggishness at bay.

Beans are a healthy addition to Minestrone Soup or Vegetable Hash. To spice things up try this legume-loving Habichuelas Coloradas Grandes (Island Red Beans) recipe.

Chi-Chi-Chi-Chia! The name may make you think of the plant-based pet you had in the 80s, but there's more to chia than just a catchy advertising tune. Those grass-producing seeds have actually been a healthy diet staple for people since the people of the Aztec civilization roamed the Earth, and for good reason. Chia seeds are loaded with omega-3 fatty acids, fiber, manganese, phosphorus (for healthy teeth and bones!), and protein. All of these wonderful traits help stabilize blood sugar, keep energy levels high, fill you up, and may even reduce cholesterol. If that's not enough, chia seeds contain skin-saving radicals that help your complexion glow year round.

New to chia seeds? Try sprinkling them over a cup of low-fat yogurt or mixing the seeds into your morning oatmeal for a fueled-up breakfast. Or discover their nutty flavor by stirring chia seeds into this incredible lentil dish.

While it does have caffeine, green tea boosts your energy without the jitters that can come after consuming other more highly caffeinated beverages. The aromatic drink is loaded with an amino acid called L-theanine, and it offers a long list of health benefits. It may even lower your risk of heart disease, Parkinson's disease, and cancer.

Just a handful of these delicious nuts can fill you up and give you the energy boost you need. They're high in protein, magnesium, and fiber. Keep a stash of these affordable nuts in your purse so you can grab a few when you need them. Don't let their fat content scare you away. Almonds have mostly monounsaturated fats &mdash the good kind &mdash which contribute to a reduction in cholesterol.

Cucumbers are mostly enzyme-filled water (about 96 percent) and contain vitamins A, B and C, zinc, iron, folic acid, calcium, magnesium, and potassium. All of this nutritional love can give you a quick pick-me-up without overloading the calories. Plus, cucumbers are great for the complexion because of their silica content, which boosts skin's moisture and elasticity.


15 Foods and Drinks That Naturally Boost Energy

When you need an energy boost, skip the soda and the sugary candies. They'll only lead you down the road to a sugar crash. These natural, health-boosting foods and drinks will help get you back to a focused (and productive!) state.

Consuming water is the easiest and most natural way to boost energy. It seems so simple, but most of us don't get enough. Dehydration can drain your energy, alter your mood, and slow your metabolism down. If you find plain water too boring, add lemon, lime, or cucumber for some extra flavor.

Known as the super greens, kale, spinach, chard, and watercress are loaded with vitamins A, C, E, and K, and are all low in calories and high in fiber. Leafy greens are also packed with magnesium, potassium, folate, and calcium, which all help brain function, maintain healthy bones, and manage blood pressure.

Add the super greens to your diet with these amazing, energy-packed recipes:

This cruciferous vegetable is high in vitamin C (1/2 cup gives you 80 percent of your recommended daily intake), fiber, iron, beta-carotene, and antioxidants. Also, our green friend contains chromium, which helps regulate blood sugar, keeping energy levels steady. To make sure you get all of those super benefits, only lightly cook broccoli (i.e. steam it for 5 minutes) or eat it raw.

Don't give in to carb hating. Your body needs carbohydrates for fuel and a serotonin boost. The key is to eat smart carbs that are whole grains, which provide a slow and steady release of fuel to keep your energy level consistent and balanced. Quinoa, which is actually a seed, is packed with protein, contains all nine essential amino acids, provides a massive 118 mg of magnesium per serving, and is quick and simple to cook.

Hungry now? Try these nutritious quinoa recipes to prevent an energy crash:

On salads, baked into bread, or just on their own, walnuts are a true superfood. The amino acids found in this healthy snack help improve blood flow to muscles to combat any slugglish feelings. The nuts contain oleic acid, which can reduce depression, and are packed with filling and energizing fiber, omega-3s, copper, manganese, and vitamin E. The nuts may even give your brain a boost and help slow the onset of Alzheimer&rsquos and Parkinson&rsquos disease.

The blue color of this tasty fruit is caused by a group of flavonoids called anthocyanins, which are high-powered antioxidants. Blueberries offer disease-fighting phytochemicals, are super-high in vitamin C, and provide fiber, which helps regulate blood-sugar levels. Although they are delicious on their own, you can take blueberries to the next level with this Blueberry-Melon Salad With Thyme Syrup.

As the most common go-to solution for a quick pick-me-up, coffee sometimes gets a bum rap. But when consumed in moderation, coffee actually has some health benefits. A cup of joe has been shown to help reduce the risk of Alzheimer&rsquos disease, depression, Type 2 Diabetes, and jump-start the metabolism. But it is recommended that you keep your java habit limited to just three 5-ounce cups per day.

Dairy-free dark chocolate is the delicious sweet treat you need to break an energy rut. It gives you a slight boost, and its phenylethylamine encourages your brain to release endorphins and put you in a better mood. Chocolate also has flavonoids, which help fight off the not-so-good LDL cholesterol and increase the blood flow to your brain. That should help make you more alert.

Slurp them up! Low-fat and high in protein, six medium oysters contain 31 percent of your daily required intake of iron, 272 percent of your daily need for vitamin B12, and a whopping 509 percent of your daily need of zinc. If that's not enough, those bites are high in omega-3 fatty acids and can help maintain healthy brain function. And you may just need the energy boost all of those good-for-you vitamins and minerals provide since oysters are, ahem, an aphrodisiac.

Indulge in oyster goodness with these recipes:

With a green that's this high in magnesium (half a cup has 78 mg) and folate, rich in calcium, and bursting with vitamins A and B, it's no wonder Popeye was able to stay so strong on his spinach diet. This leafy green helps prevent inflammation, can lower the risk of heart disease, and has more iron than any other green vegetable. And that iron is key to helping you keep your energy level high. Combine spinach with vitamin C-rich foods, like oranges and lemons, to more effectively absorb the iron.

Try this tasty, vitamin-filledCitrusy Spinach and Salmon Salad for a quick energy boost.

This plant-based food is a high-protein alternative to high-fat, high cholesterol meat. Beans have a low glycemic index, which helps stabilize the energy they provide. Kidney and black beans are high in magnesium (70mg and 120mg for every 1 cup, respectively). Red beans are particularly high in antioxidants and iron. Eating a serving can help keep sluggishness at bay.

Beans are a healthy addition to Minestrone Soup or Vegetable Hash. To spice things up try this legume-loving Habichuelas Coloradas Grandes (Island Red Beans) recipe.

Chi-Chi-Chi-Chia! The name may make you think of the plant-based pet you had in the 80s, but there's more to chia than just a catchy advertising tune. Those grass-producing seeds have actually been a healthy diet staple for people since the people of the Aztec civilization roamed the Earth, and for good reason. Chia seeds are loaded with omega-3 fatty acids, fiber, manganese, phosphorus (for healthy teeth and bones!), and protein. All of these wonderful traits help stabilize blood sugar, keep energy levels high, fill you up, and may even reduce cholesterol. If that's not enough, chia seeds contain skin-saving radicals that help your complexion glow year round.

New to chia seeds? Try sprinkling them over a cup of low-fat yogurt or mixing the seeds into your morning oatmeal for a fueled-up breakfast. Or discover their nutty flavor by stirring chia seeds into this incredible lentil dish.

While it does have caffeine, green tea boosts your energy without the jitters that can come after consuming other more highly caffeinated beverages. The aromatic drink is loaded with an amino acid called L-theanine, and it offers a long list of health benefits. It may even lower your risk of heart disease, Parkinson's disease, and cancer.

Just a handful of these delicious nuts can fill you up and give you the energy boost you need. They're high in protein, magnesium, and fiber. Keep a stash of these affordable nuts in your purse so you can grab a few when you need them. Don't let their fat content scare you away. Almonds have mostly monounsaturated fats &mdash the good kind &mdash which contribute to a reduction in cholesterol.

Cucumbers are mostly enzyme-filled water (about 96 percent) and contain vitamins A, B and C, zinc, iron, folic acid, calcium, magnesium, and potassium. All of this nutritional love can give you a quick pick-me-up without overloading the calories. Plus, cucumbers are great for the complexion because of their silica content, which boosts skin's moisture and elasticity.


15 Foods and Drinks That Naturally Boost Energy

When you need an energy boost, skip the soda and the sugary candies. They'll only lead you down the road to a sugar crash. These natural, health-boosting foods and drinks will help get you back to a focused (and productive!) state.

Consuming water is the easiest and most natural way to boost energy. It seems so simple, but most of us don't get enough. Dehydration can drain your energy, alter your mood, and slow your metabolism down. If you find plain water too boring, add lemon, lime, or cucumber for some extra flavor.

Known as the super greens, kale, spinach, chard, and watercress are loaded with vitamins A, C, E, and K, and are all low in calories and high in fiber. Leafy greens are also packed with magnesium, potassium, folate, and calcium, which all help brain function, maintain healthy bones, and manage blood pressure.

Add the super greens to your diet with these amazing, energy-packed recipes:

This cruciferous vegetable is high in vitamin C (1/2 cup gives you 80 percent of your recommended daily intake), fiber, iron, beta-carotene, and antioxidants. Also, our green friend contains chromium, which helps regulate blood sugar, keeping energy levels steady. To make sure you get all of those super benefits, only lightly cook broccoli (i.e. steam it for 5 minutes) or eat it raw.

Don't give in to carb hating. Your body needs carbohydrates for fuel and a serotonin boost. The key is to eat smart carbs that are whole grains, which provide a slow and steady release of fuel to keep your energy level consistent and balanced. Quinoa, which is actually a seed, is packed with protein, contains all nine essential amino acids, provides a massive 118 mg of magnesium per serving, and is quick and simple to cook.

Hungry now? Try these nutritious quinoa recipes to prevent an energy crash:

On salads, baked into bread, or just on their own, walnuts are a true superfood. The amino acids found in this healthy snack help improve blood flow to muscles to combat any slugglish feelings. The nuts contain oleic acid, which can reduce depression, and are packed with filling and energizing fiber, omega-3s, copper, manganese, and vitamin E. The nuts may even give your brain a boost and help slow the onset of Alzheimer&rsquos and Parkinson&rsquos disease.

The blue color of this tasty fruit is caused by a group of flavonoids called anthocyanins, which are high-powered antioxidants. Blueberries offer disease-fighting phytochemicals, are super-high in vitamin C, and provide fiber, which helps regulate blood-sugar levels. Although they are delicious on their own, you can take blueberries to the next level with this Blueberry-Melon Salad With Thyme Syrup.

As the most common go-to solution for a quick pick-me-up, coffee sometimes gets a bum rap. But when consumed in moderation, coffee actually has some health benefits. A cup of joe has been shown to help reduce the risk of Alzheimer&rsquos disease, depression, Type 2 Diabetes, and jump-start the metabolism. But it is recommended that you keep your java habit limited to just three 5-ounce cups per day.

Dairy-free dark chocolate is the delicious sweet treat you need to break an energy rut. It gives you a slight boost, and its phenylethylamine encourages your brain to release endorphins and put you in a better mood. Chocolate also has flavonoids, which help fight off the not-so-good LDL cholesterol and increase the blood flow to your brain. That should help make you more alert.

Slurp them up! Low-fat and high in protein, six medium oysters contain 31 percent of your daily required intake of iron, 272 percent of your daily need for vitamin B12, and a whopping 509 percent of your daily need of zinc. If that's not enough, those bites are high in omega-3 fatty acids and can help maintain healthy brain function. And you may just need the energy boost all of those good-for-you vitamins and minerals provide since oysters are, ahem, an aphrodisiac.

Indulge in oyster goodness with these recipes:

With a green that's this high in magnesium (half a cup has 78 mg) and folate, rich in calcium, and bursting with vitamins A and B, it's no wonder Popeye was able to stay so strong on his spinach diet. This leafy green helps prevent inflammation, can lower the risk of heart disease, and has more iron than any other green vegetable. And that iron is key to helping you keep your energy level high. Combine spinach with vitamin C-rich foods, like oranges and lemons, to more effectively absorb the iron.

Try this tasty, vitamin-filledCitrusy Spinach and Salmon Salad for a quick energy boost.

This plant-based food is a high-protein alternative to high-fat, high cholesterol meat. Beans have a low glycemic index, which helps stabilize the energy they provide. Kidney and black beans are high in magnesium (70mg and 120mg for every 1 cup, respectively). Red beans are particularly high in antioxidants and iron. Eating a serving can help keep sluggishness at bay.

Beans are a healthy addition to Minestrone Soup or Vegetable Hash. To spice things up try this legume-loving Habichuelas Coloradas Grandes (Island Red Beans) recipe.

Chi-Chi-Chi-Chia! The name may make you think of the plant-based pet you had in the 80s, but there's more to chia than just a catchy advertising tune. Those grass-producing seeds have actually been a healthy diet staple for people since the people of the Aztec civilization roamed the Earth, and for good reason. Chia seeds are loaded with omega-3 fatty acids, fiber, manganese, phosphorus (for healthy teeth and bones!), and protein. All of these wonderful traits help stabilize blood sugar, keep energy levels high, fill you up, and may even reduce cholesterol. If that's not enough, chia seeds contain skin-saving radicals that help your complexion glow year round.

New to chia seeds? Try sprinkling them over a cup of low-fat yogurt or mixing the seeds into your morning oatmeal for a fueled-up breakfast. Or discover their nutty flavor by stirring chia seeds into this incredible lentil dish.

While it does have caffeine, green tea boosts your energy without the jitters that can come after consuming other more highly caffeinated beverages. The aromatic drink is loaded with an amino acid called L-theanine, and it offers a long list of health benefits. It may even lower your risk of heart disease, Parkinson's disease, and cancer.

Just a handful of these delicious nuts can fill you up and give you the energy boost you need. They're high in protein, magnesium, and fiber. Keep a stash of these affordable nuts in your purse so you can grab a few when you need them. Don't let their fat content scare you away. Almonds have mostly monounsaturated fats &mdash the good kind &mdash which contribute to a reduction in cholesterol.

Cucumbers are mostly enzyme-filled water (about 96 percent) and contain vitamins A, B and C, zinc, iron, folic acid, calcium, magnesium, and potassium. All of this nutritional love can give you a quick pick-me-up without overloading the calories. Plus, cucumbers are great for the complexion because of their silica content, which boosts skin's moisture and elasticity.


15 Foods and Drinks That Naturally Boost Energy

When you need an energy boost, skip the soda and the sugary candies. They'll only lead you down the road to a sugar crash. These natural, health-boosting foods and drinks will help get you back to a focused (and productive!) state.

Consuming water is the easiest and most natural way to boost energy. It seems so simple, but most of us don't get enough. Dehydration can drain your energy, alter your mood, and slow your metabolism down. If you find plain water too boring, add lemon, lime, or cucumber for some extra flavor.

Known as the super greens, kale, spinach, chard, and watercress are loaded with vitamins A, C, E, and K, and are all low in calories and high in fiber. Leafy greens are also packed with magnesium, potassium, folate, and calcium, which all help brain function, maintain healthy bones, and manage blood pressure.

Add the super greens to your diet with these amazing, energy-packed recipes:

This cruciferous vegetable is high in vitamin C (1/2 cup gives you 80 percent of your recommended daily intake), fiber, iron, beta-carotene, and antioxidants. Also, our green friend contains chromium, which helps regulate blood sugar, keeping energy levels steady. To make sure you get all of those super benefits, only lightly cook broccoli (i.e. steam it for 5 minutes) or eat it raw.

Don't give in to carb hating. Your body needs carbohydrates for fuel and a serotonin boost. The key is to eat smart carbs that are whole grains, which provide a slow and steady release of fuel to keep your energy level consistent and balanced. Quinoa, which is actually a seed, is packed with protein, contains all nine essential amino acids, provides a massive 118 mg of magnesium per serving, and is quick and simple to cook.

Hungry now? Try these nutritious quinoa recipes to prevent an energy crash:

On salads, baked into bread, or just on their own, walnuts are a true superfood. The amino acids found in this healthy snack help improve blood flow to muscles to combat any slugglish feelings. The nuts contain oleic acid, which can reduce depression, and are packed with filling and energizing fiber, omega-3s, copper, manganese, and vitamin E. The nuts may even give your brain a boost and help slow the onset of Alzheimer&rsquos and Parkinson&rsquos disease.

The blue color of this tasty fruit is caused by a group of flavonoids called anthocyanins, which are high-powered antioxidants. Blueberries offer disease-fighting phytochemicals, are super-high in vitamin C, and provide fiber, which helps regulate blood-sugar levels. Although they are delicious on their own, you can take blueberries to the next level with this Blueberry-Melon Salad With Thyme Syrup.

As the most common go-to solution for a quick pick-me-up, coffee sometimes gets a bum rap. But when consumed in moderation, coffee actually has some health benefits. A cup of joe has been shown to help reduce the risk of Alzheimer&rsquos disease, depression, Type 2 Diabetes, and jump-start the metabolism. But it is recommended that you keep your java habit limited to just three 5-ounce cups per day.

Dairy-free dark chocolate is the delicious sweet treat you need to break an energy rut. It gives you a slight boost, and its phenylethylamine encourages your brain to release endorphins and put you in a better mood. Chocolate also has flavonoids, which help fight off the not-so-good LDL cholesterol and increase the blood flow to your brain. That should help make you more alert.

Slurp them up! Low-fat and high in protein, six medium oysters contain 31 percent of your daily required intake of iron, 272 percent of your daily need for vitamin B12, and a whopping 509 percent of your daily need of zinc. If that's not enough, those bites are high in omega-3 fatty acids and can help maintain healthy brain function. And you may just need the energy boost all of those good-for-you vitamins and minerals provide since oysters are, ahem, an aphrodisiac.

Indulge in oyster goodness with these recipes:

With a green that's this high in magnesium (half a cup has 78 mg) and folate, rich in calcium, and bursting with vitamins A and B, it's no wonder Popeye was able to stay so strong on his spinach diet. This leafy green helps prevent inflammation, can lower the risk of heart disease, and has more iron than any other green vegetable. And that iron is key to helping you keep your energy level high. Combine spinach with vitamin C-rich foods, like oranges and lemons, to more effectively absorb the iron.

Try this tasty, vitamin-filledCitrusy Spinach and Salmon Salad for a quick energy boost.

This plant-based food is a high-protein alternative to high-fat, high cholesterol meat. Beans have a low glycemic index, which helps stabilize the energy they provide. Kidney and black beans are high in magnesium (70mg and 120mg for every 1 cup, respectively). Red beans are particularly high in antioxidants and iron. Eating a serving can help keep sluggishness at bay.

Beans are a healthy addition to Minestrone Soup or Vegetable Hash. To spice things up try this legume-loving Habichuelas Coloradas Grandes (Island Red Beans) recipe.

Chi-Chi-Chi-Chia! The name may make you think of the plant-based pet you had in the 80s, but there's more to chia than just a catchy advertising tune. Those grass-producing seeds have actually been a healthy diet staple for people since the people of the Aztec civilization roamed the Earth, and for good reason. Chia seeds are loaded with omega-3 fatty acids, fiber, manganese, phosphorus (for healthy teeth and bones!), and protein. All of these wonderful traits help stabilize blood sugar, keep energy levels high, fill you up, and may even reduce cholesterol. If that's not enough, chia seeds contain skin-saving radicals that help your complexion glow year round.

New to chia seeds? Try sprinkling them over a cup of low-fat yogurt or mixing the seeds into your morning oatmeal for a fueled-up breakfast. Or discover their nutty flavor by stirring chia seeds into this incredible lentil dish.

While it does have caffeine, green tea boosts your energy without the jitters that can come after consuming other more highly caffeinated beverages. The aromatic drink is loaded with an amino acid called L-theanine, and it offers a long list of health benefits. It may even lower your risk of heart disease, Parkinson's disease, and cancer.

Just a handful of these delicious nuts can fill you up and give you the energy boost you need. They're high in protein, magnesium, and fiber. Keep a stash of these affordable nuts in your purse so you can grab a few when you need them. Don't let their fat content scare you away. Almonds have mostly monounsaturated fats &mdash the good kind &mdash which contribute to a reduction in cholesterol.

Cucumbers are mostly enzyme-filled water (about 96 percent) and contain vitamins A, B and C, zinc, iron, folic acid, calcium, magnesium, and potassium. All of this nutritional love can give you a quick pick-me-up without overloading the calories. Plus, cucumbers are great for the complexion because of their silica content, which boosts skin's moisture and elasticity.


15 Foods and Drinks That Naturally Boost Energy

When you need an energy boost, skip the soda and the sugary candies. They'll only lead you down the road to a sugar crash. These natural, health-boosting foods and drinks will help get you back to a focused (and productive!) state.

Consuming water is the easiest and most natural way to boost energy. It seems so simple, but most of us don't get enough. Dehydration can drain your energy, alter your mood, and slow your metabolism down. If you find plain water too boring, add lemon, lime, or cucumber for some extra flavor.

Known as the super greens, kale, spinach, chard, and watercress are loaded with vitamins A, C, E, and K, and are all low in calories and high in fiber. Leafy greens are also packed with magnesium, potassium, folate, and calcium, which all help brain function, maintain healthy bones, and manage blood pressure.

Add the super greens to your diet with these amazing, energy-packed recipes:

This cruciferous vegetable is high in vitamin C (1/2 cup gives you 80 percent of your recommended daily intake), fiber, iron, beta-carotene, and antioxidants. Also, our green friend contains chromium, which helps regulate blood sugar, keeping energy levels steady. To make sure you get all of those super benefits, only lightly cook broccoli (i.e. steam it for 5 minutes) or eat it raw.

Don't give in to carb hating. Your body needs carbohydrates for fuel and a serotonin boost. The key is to eat smart carbs that are whole grains, which provide a slow and steady release of fuel to keep your energy level consistent and balanced. Quinoa, which is actually a seed, is packed with protein, contains all nine essential amino acids, provides a massive 118 mg of magnesium per serving, and is quick and simple to cook.

Hungry now? Try these nutritious quinoa recipes to prevent an energy crash:

On salads, baked into bread, or just on their own, walnuts are a true superfood. The amino acids found in this healthy snack help improve blood flow to muscles to combat any slugglish feelings. The nuts contain oleic acid, which can reduce depression, and are packed with filling and energizing fiber, omega-3s, copper, manganese, and vitamin E. The nuts may even give your brain a boost and help slow the onset of Alzheimer&rsquos and Parkinson&rsquos disease.

The blue color of this tasty fruit is caused by a group of flavonoids called anthocyanins, which are high-powered antioxidants. Blueberries offer disease-fighting phytochemicals, are super-high in vitamin C, and provide fiber, which helps regulate blood-sugar levels. Although they are delicious on their own, you can take blueberries to the next level with this Blueberry-Melon Salad With Thyme Syrup.

As the most common go-to solution for a quick pick-me-up, coffee sometimes gets a bum rap. But when consumed in moderation, coffee actually has some health benefits. A cup of joe has been shown to help reduce the risk of Alzheimer&rsquos disease, depression, Type 2 Diabetes, and jump-start the metabolism. But it is recommended that you keep your java habit limited to just three 5-ounce cups per day.

Dairy-free dark chocolate is the delicious sweet treat you need to break an energy rut. It gives you a slight boost, and its phenylethylamine encourages your brain to release endorphins and put you in a better mood. Chocolate also has flavonoids, which help fight off the not-so-good LDL cholesterol and increase the blood flow to your brain. That should help make you more alert.

Slurp them up! Low-fat and high in protein, six medium oysters contain 31 percent of your daily required intake of iron, 272 percent of your daily need for vitamin B12, and a whopping 509 percent of your daily need of zinc. If that's not enough, those bites are high in omega-3 fatty acids and can help maintain healthy brain function. And you may just need the energy boost all of those good-for-you vitamins and minerals provide since oysters are, ahem, an aphrodisiac.

Indulge in oyster goodness with these recipes:

With a green that's this high in magnesium (half a cup has 78 mg) and folate, rich in calcium, and bursting with vitamins A and B, it's no wonder Popeye was able to stay so strong on his spinach diet. This leafy green helps prevent inflammation, can lower the risk of heart disease, and has more iron than any other green vegetable. And that iron is key to helping you keep your energy level high. Combine spinach with vitamin C-rich foods, like oranges and lemons, to more effectively absorb the iron.

Try this tasty, vitamin-filledCitrusy Spinach and Salmon Salad for a quick energy boost.

This plant-based food is a high-protein alternative to high-fat, high cholesterol meat. Beans have a low glycemic index, which helps stabilize the energy they provide. Kidney and black beans are high in magnesium (70mg and 120mg for every 1 cup, respectively). Red beans are particularly high in antioxidants and iron. Eating a serving can help keep sluggishness at bay.

Beans are a healthy addition to Minestrone Soup or Vegetable Hash. To spice things up try this legume-loving Habichuelas Coloradas Grandes (Island Red Beans) recipe.

Chi-Chi-Chi-Chia! The name may make you think of the plant-based pet you had in the 80s, but there's more to chia than just a catchy advertising tune. Those grass-producing seeds have actually been a healthy diet staple for people since the people of the Aztec civilization roamed the Earth, and for good reason. Chia seeds are loaded with omega-3 fatty acids, fiber, manganese, phosphorus (for healthy teeth and bones!), and protein. All of these wonderful traits help stabilize blood sugar, keep energy levels high, fill you up, and may even reduce cholesterol. If that's not enough, chia seeds contain skin-saving radicals that help your complexion glow year round.

New to chia seeds? Try sprinkling them over a cup of low-fat yogurt or mixing the seeds into your morning oatmeal for a fueled-up breakfast. Or discover their nutty flavor by stirring chia seeds into this incredible lentil dish.

While it does have caffeine, green tea boosts your energy without the jitters that can come after consuming other more highly caffeinated beverages. The aromatic drink is loaded with an amino acid called L-theanine, and it offers a long list of health benefits. It may even lower your risk of heart disease, Parkinson's disease, and cancer.

Just a handful of these delicious nuts can fill you up and give you the energy boost you need. They're high in protein, magnesium, and fiber. Keep a stash of these affordable nuts in your purse so you can grab a few when you need them. Don't let their fat content scare you away. Almonds have mostly monounsaturated fats &mdash the good kind &mdash which contribute to a reduction in cholesterol.

Cucumbers are mostly enzyme-filled water (about 96 percent) and contain vitamins A, B and C, zinc, iron, folic acid, calcium, magnesium, and potassium. All of this nutritional love can give you a quick pick-me-up without overloading the calories. Plus, cucumbers are great for the complexion because of their silica content, which boosts skin's moisture and elasticity.


15 Foods and Drinks That Naturally Boost Energy

When you need an energy boost, skip the soda and the sugary candies. They'll only lead you down the road to a sugar crash. These natural, health-boosting foods and drinks will help get you back to a focused (and productive!) state.

Consuming water is the easiest and most natural way to boost energy. It seems so simple, but most of us don't get enough. Dehydration can drain your energy, alter your mood, and slow your metabolism down. If you find plain water too boring, add lemon, lime, or cucumber for some extra flavor.

Known as the super greens, kale, spinach, chard, and watercress are loaded with vitamins A, C, E, and K, and are all low in calories and high in fiber. Leafy greens are also packed with magnesium, potassium, folate, and calcium, which all help brain function, maintain healthy bones, and manage blood pressure.

Add the super greens to your diet with these amazing, energy-packed recipes:

This cruciferous vegetable is high in vitamin C (1/2 cup gives you 80 percent of your recommended daily intake), fiber, iron, beta-carotene, and antioxidants. Also, our green friend contains chromium, which helps regulate blood sugar, keeping energy levels steady. To make sure you get all of those super benefits, only lightly cook broccoli (i.e. steam it for 5 minutes) or eat it raw.

Don't give in to carb hating. Your body needs carbohydrates for fuel and a serotonin boost. The key is to eat smart carbs that are whole grains, which provide a slow and steady release of fuel to keep your energy level consistent and balanced. Quinoa, which is actually a seed, is packed with protein, contains all nine essential amino acids, provides a massive 118 mg of magnesium per serving, and is quick and simple to cook.

Hungry now? Try these nutritious quinoa recipes to prevent an energy crash:

On salads, baked into bread, or just on their own, walnuts are a true superfood. The amino acids found in this healthy snack help improve blood flow to muscles to combat any slugglish feelings. The nuts contain oleic acid, which can reduce depression, and are packed with filling and energizing fiber, omega-3s, copper, manganese, and vitamin E. The nuts may even give your brain a boost and help slow the onset of Alzheimer&rsquos and Parkinson&rsquos disease.

The blue color of this tasty fruit is caused by a group of flavonoids called anthocyanins, which are high-powered antioxidants. Blueberries offer disease-fighting phytochemicals, are super-high in vitamin C, and provide fiber, which helps regulate blood-sugar levels. Although they are delicious on their own, you can take blueberries to the next level with this Blueberry-Melon Salad With Thyme Syrup.

As the most common go-to solution for a quick pick-me-up, coffee sometimes gets a bum rap. But when consumed in moderation, coffee actually has some health benefits. A cup of joe has been shown to help reduce the risk of Alzheimer&rsquos disease, depression, Type 2 Diabetes, and jump-start the metabolism. But it is recommended that you keep your java habit limited to just three 5-ounce cups per day.

Dairy-free dark chocolate is the delicious sweet treat you need to break an energy rut. It gives you a slight boost, and its phenylethylamine encourages your brain to release endorphins and put you in a better mood. Chocolate also has flavonoids, which help fight off the not-so-good LDL cholesterol and increase the blood flow to your brain. That should help make you more alert.

Slurp them up! Low-fat and high in protein, six medium oysters contain 31 percent of your daily required intake of iron, 272 percent of your daily need for vitamin B12, and a whopping 509 percent of your daily need of zinc. If that's not enough, those bites are high in omega-3 fatty acids and can help maintain healthy brain function. And you may just need the energy boost all of those good-for-you vitamins and minerals provide since oysters are, ahem, an aphrodisiac.

Indulge in oyster goodness with these recipes:

With a green that's this high in magnesium (half a cup has 78 mg) and folate, rich in calcium, and bursting with vitamins A and B, it's no wonder Popeye was able to stay so strong on his spinach diet. This leafy green helps prevent inflammation, can lower the risk of heart disease, and has more iron than any other green vegetable. And that iron is key to helping you keep your energy level high. Combine spinach with vitamin C-rich foods, like oranges and lemons, to more effectively absorb the iron.

Try this tasty, vitamin-filledCitrusy Spinach and Salmon Salad for a quick energy boost.

This plant-based food is a high-protein alternative to high-fat, high cholesterol meat. Beans have a low glycemic index, which helps stabilize the energy they provide. Kidney and black beans are high in magnesium (70mg and 120mg for every 1 cup, respectively). Red beans are particularly high in antioxidants and iron. Eating a serving can help keep sluggishness at bay.

Beans are a healthy addition to Minestrone Soup or Vegetable Hash. To spice things up try this legume-loving Habichuelas Coloradas Grandes (Island Red Beans) recipe.

Chi-Chi-Chi-Chia! The name may make you think of the plant-based pet you had in the 80s, but there's more to chia than just a catchy advertising tune. Those grass-producing seeds have actually been a healthy diet staple for people since the people of the Aztec civilization roamed the Earth, and for good reason. Chia seeds are loaded with omega-3 fatty acids, fiber, manganese, phosphorus (for healthy teeth and bones!), and protein. All of these wonderful traits help stabilize blood sugar, keep energy levels high, fill you up, and may even reduce cholesterol. If that's not enough, chia seeds contain skin-saving radicals that help your complexion glow year round.

New to chia seeds? Try sprinkling them over a cup of low-fat yogurt or mixing the seeds into your morning oatmeal for a fueled-up breakfast. Or discover their nutty flavor by stirring chia seeds into this incredible lentil dish.

While it does have caffeine, green tea boosts your energy without the jitters that can come after consuming other more highly caffeinated beverages. The aromatic drink is loaded with an amino acid called L-theanine, and it offers a long list of health benefits. It may even lower your risk of heart disease, Parkinson's disease, and cancer.

Just a handful of these delicious nuts can fill you up and give you the energy boost you need. They're high in protein, magnesium, and fiber. Keep a stash of these affordable nuts in your purse so you can grab a few when you need them. Don't let their fat content scare you away. Almonds have mostly monounsaturated fats &mdash the good kind &mdash which contribute to a reduction in cholesterol.

Cucumbers are mostly enzyme-filled water (about 96 percent) and contain vitamins A, B and C, zinc, iron, folic acid, calcium, magnesium, and potassium. All of this nutritional love can give you a quick pick-me-up without overloading the calories. Plus, cucumbers are great for the complexion because of their silica content, which boosts skin's moisture and elasticity.


15 Foods and Drinks That Naturally Boost Energy

When you need an energy boost, skip the soda and the sugary candies. They'll only lead you down the road to a sugar crash. These natural, health-boosting foods and drinks will help get you back to a focused (and productive!) state.

Consuming water is the easiest and most natural way to boost energy. It seems so simple, but most of us don't get enough. Dehydration can drain your energy, alter your mood, and slow your metabolism down. If you find plain water too boring, add lemon, lime, or cucumber for some extra flavor.

Known as the super greens, kale, spinach, chard, and watercress are loaded with vitamins A, C, E, and K, and are all low in calories and high in fiber. Leafy greens are also packed with magnesium, potassium, folate, and calcium, which all help brain function, maintain healthy bones, and manage blood pressure.

Add the super greens to your diet with these amazing, energy-packed recipes:

This cruciferous vegetable is high in vitamin C (1/2 cup gives you 80 percent of your recommended daily intake), fiber, iron, beta-carotene, and antioxidants. Also, our green friend contains chromium, which helps regulate blood sugar, keeping energy levels steady. To make sure you get all of those super benefits, only lightly cook broccoli (i.e. steam it for 5 minutes) or eat it raw.

Don't give in to carb hating. Your body needs carbohydrates for fuel and a serotonin boost. The key is to eat smart carbs that are whole grains, which provide a slow and steady release of fuel to keep your energy level consistent and balanced. Quinoa, which is actually a seed, is packed with protein, contains all nine essential amino acids, provides a massive 118 mg of magnesium per serving, and is quick and simple to cook.

Hungry now? Try these nutritious quinoa recipes to prevent an energy crash:

On salads, baked into bread, or just on their own, walnuts are a true superfood. The amino acids found in this healthy snack help improve blood flow to muscles to combat any slugglish feelings. The nuts contain oleic acid, which can reduce depression, and are packed with filling and energizing fiber, omega-3s, copper, manganese, and vitamin E. The nuts may even give your brain a boost and help slow the onset of Alzheimer&rsquos and Parkinson&rsquos disease.

The blue color of this tasty fruit is caused by a group of flavonoids called anthocyanins, which are high-powered antioxidants. Blueberries offer disease-fighting phytochemicals, are super-high in vitamin C, and provide fiber, which helps regulate blood-sugar levels. Although they are delicious on their own, you can take blueberries to the next level with this Blueberry-Melon Salad With Thyme Syrup.

As the most common go-to solution for a quick pick-me-up, coffee sometimes gets a bum rap. But when consumed in moderation, coffee actually has some health benefits. A cup of joe has been shown to help reduce the risk of Alzheimer&rsquos disease, depression, Type 2 Diabetes, and jump-start the metabolism. But it is recommended that you keep your java habit limited to just three 5-ounce cups per day.

Dairy-free dark chocolate is the delicious sweet treat you need to break an energy rut. It gives you a slight boost, and its phenylethylamine encourages your brain to release endorphins and put you in a better mood. Chocolate also has flavonoids, which help fight off the not-so-good LDL cholesterol and increase the blood flow to your brain. That should help make you more alert.

Slurp them up! Low-fat and high in protein, six medium oysters contain 31 percent of your daily required intake of iron, 272 percent of your daily need for vitamin B12, and a whopping 509 percent of your daily need of zinc. If that's not enough, those bites are high in omega-3 fatty acids and can help maintain healthy brain function. And you may just need the energy boost all of those good-for-you vitamins and minerals provide since oysters are, ahem, an aphrodisiac.

Indulge in oyster goodness with these recipes:

With a green that's this high in magnesium (half a cup has 78 mg) and folate, rich in calcium, and bursting with vitamins A and B, it's no wonder Popeye was able to stay so strong on his spinach diet. This leafy green helps prevent inflammation, can lower the risk of heart disease, and has more iron than any other green vegetable. And that iron is key to helping you keep your energy level high. Combine spinach with vitamin C-rich foods, like oranges and lemons, to more effectively absorb the iron.

Try this tasty, vitamin-filledCitrusy Spinach and Salmon Salad for a quick energy boost.

This plant-based food is a high-protein alternative to high-fat, high cholesterol meat. Beans have a low glycemic index, which helps stabilize the energy they provide. Kidney and black beans are high in magnesium (70mg and 120mg for every 1 cup, respectively). Red beans are particularly high in antioxidants and iron. Eating a serving can help keep sluggishness at bay.

Beans are a healthy addition to Minestrone Soup or Vegetable Hash. To spice things up try this legume-loving Habichuelas Coloradas Grandes (Island Red Beans) recipe.

Chi-Chi-Chi-Chia! The name may make you think of the plant-based pet you had in the 80s, but there's more to chia than just a catchy advertising tune. Those grass-producing seeds have actually been a healthy diet staple for people since the people of the Aztec civilization roamed the Earth, and for good reason. Chia seeds are loaded with omega-3 fatty acids, fiber, manganese, phosphorus (for healthy teeth and bones!), and protein. All of these wonderful traits help stabilize blood sugar, keep energy levels high, fill you up, and may even reduce cholesterol. If that's not enough, chia seeds contain skin-saving radicals that help your complexion glow year round.

New to chia seeds? Try sprinkling them over a cup of low-fat yogurt or mixing the seeds into your morning oatmeal for a fueled-up breakfast. Or discover their nutty flavor by stirring chia seeds into this incredible lentil dish.

While it does have caffeine, green tea boosts your energy without the jitters that can come after consuming other more highly caffeinated beverages. The aromatic drink is loaded with an amino acid called L-theanine, and it offers a long list of health benefits. It may even lower your risk of heart disease, Parkinson's disease, and cancer.

Just a handful of these delicious nuts can fill you up and give you the energy boost you need. They're high in protein, magnesium, and fiber. Keep a stash of these affordable nuts in your purse so you can grab a few when you need them. Don't let their fat content scare you away. Almonds have mostly monounsaturated fats &mdash the good kind &mdash which contribute to a reduction in cholesterol.

Cucumbers are mostly enzyme-filled water (about 96 percent) and contain vitamins A, B and C, zinc, iron, folic acid, calcium, magnesium, and potassium. All of this nutritional love can give you a quick pick-me-up without overloading the calories. Plus, cucumbers are great for the complexion because of their silica content, which boosts skin's moisture and elasticity.


15 Foods and Drinks That Naturally Boost Energy

When you need an energy boost, skip the soda and the sugary candies. They'll only lead you down the road to a sugar crash. These natural, health-boosting foods and drinks will help get you back to a focused (and productive!) state.

Consuming water is the easiest and most natural way to boost energy. It seems so simple, but most of us don't get enough. Dehydration can drain your energy, alter your mood, and slow your metabolism down. If you find plain water too boring, add lemon, lime, or cucumber for some extra flavor.

Known as the super greens, kale, spinach, chard, and watercress are loaded with vitamins A, C, E, and K, and are all low in calories and high in fiber. Leafy greens are also packed with magnesium, potassium, folate, and calcium, which all help brain function, maintain healthy bones, and manage blood pressure.

Add the super greens to your diet with these amazing, energy-packed recipes:

This cruciferous vegetable is high in vitamin C (1/2 cup gives you 80 percent of your recommended daily intake), fiber, iron, beta-carotene, and antioxidants. Also, our green friend contains chromium, which helps regulate blood sugar, keeping energy levels steady. To make sure you get all of those super benefits, only lightly cook broccoli (i.e. steam it for 5 minutes) or eat it raw.

Don't give in to carb hating. Your body needs carbohydrates for fuel and a serotonin boost. The key is to eat smart carbs that are whole grains, which provide a slow and steady release of fuel to keep your energy level consistent and balanced. Quinoa, which is actually a seed, is packed with protein, contains all nine essential amino acids, provides a massive 118 mg of magnesium per serving, and is quick and simple to cook.

Hungry now? Try these nutritious quinoa recipes to prevent an energy crash:

On salads, baked into bread, or just on their own, walnuts are a true superfood. The amino acids found in this healthy snack help improve blood flow to muscles to combat any slugglish feelings. The nuts contain oleic acid, which can reduce depression, and are packed with filling and energizing fiber, omega-3s, copper, manganese, and vitamin E. The nuts may even give your brain a boost and help slow the onset of Alzheimer&rsquos and Parkinson&rsquos disease.

The blue color of this tasty fruit is caused by a group of flavonoids called anthocyanins, which are high-powered antioxidants. Blueberries offer disease-fighting phytochemicals, are super-high in vitamin C, and provide fiber, which helps regulate blood-sugar levels. Although they are delicious on their own, you can take blueberries to the next level with this Blueberry-Melon Salad With Thyme Syrup.

As the most common go-to solution for a quick pick-me-up, coffee sometimes gets a bum rap. But when consumed in moderation, coffee actually has some health benefits. A cup of joe has been shown to help reduce the risk of Alzheimer&rsquos disease, depression, Type 2 Diabetes, and jump-start the metabolism. But it is recommended that you keep your java habit limited to just three 5-ounce cups per day.

Dairy-free dark chocolate is the delicious sweet treat you need to break an energy rut. It gives you a slight boost, and its phenylethylamine encourages your brain to release endorphins and put you in a better mood. Chocolate also has flavonoids, which help fight off the not-so-good LDL cholesterol and increase the blood flow to your brain. That should help make you more alert.

Slurp them up! Low-fat and high in protein, six medium oysters contain 31 percent of your daily required intake of iron, 272 percent of your daily need for vitamin B12, and a whopping 509 percent of your daily need of zinc. If that's not enough, those bites are high in omega-3 fatty acids and can help maintain healthy brain function. And you may just need the energy boost all of those good-for-you vitamins and minerals provide since oysters are, ahem, an aphrodisiac.

Indulge in oyster goodness with these recipes:

With a green that's this high in magnesium (half a cup has 78 mg) and folate, rich in calcium, and bursting with vitamins A and B, it's no wonder Popeye was able to stay so strong on his spinach diet. This leafy green helps prevent inflammation, can lower the risk of heart disease, and has more iron than any other green vegetable. And that iron is key to helping you keep your energy level high. Combine spinach with vitamin C-rich foods, like oranges and lemons, to more effectively absorb the iron.

Try this tasty, vitamin-filledCitrusy Spinach and Salmon Salad for a quick energy boost.

This plant-based food is a high-protein alternative to high-fat, high cholesterol meat. Beans have a low glycemic index, which helps stabilize the energy they provide. Kidney and black beans are high in magnesium (70mg and 120mg for every 1 cup, respectively). Red beans are particularly high in antioxidants and iron. Eating a serving can help keep sluggishness at bay.

Beans are a healthy addition to Minestrone Soup or Vegetable Hash. To spice things up try this legume-loving Habichuelas Coloradas Grandes (Island Red Beans) recipe.

Chi-Chi-Chi-Chia! The name may make you think of the plant-based pet you had in the 80s, but there's more to chia than just a catchy advertising tune. Those grass-producing seeds have actually been a healthy diet staple for people since the people of the Aztec civilization roamed the Earth, and for good reason. Chia seeds are loaded with omega-3 fatty acids, fiber, manganese, phosphorus (for healthy teeth and bones!), and protein. All of these wonderful traits help stabilize blood sugar, keep energy levels high, fill you up, and may even reduce cholesterol. If that's not enough, chia seeds contain skin-saving radicals that help your complexion glow year round.

New to chia seeds? Try sprinkling them over a cup of low-fat yogurt or mixing the seeds into your morning oatmeal for a fueled-up breakfast. Or discover their nutty flavor by stirring chia seeds into this incredible lentil dish.

While it does have caffeine, green tea boosts your energy without the jitters that can come after consuming other more highly caffeinated beverages. The aromatic drink is loaded with an amino acid called L-theanine, and it offers a long list of health benefits. It may even lower your risk of heart disease, Parkinson's disease, and cancer.

Just a handful of these delicious nuts can fill you up and give you the energy boost you need. They're high in protein, magnesium, and fiber. Keep a stash of these affordable nuts in your purse so you can grab a few when you need them. Don't let their fat content scare you away. Almonds have mostly monounsaturated fats &mdash the good kind &mdash which contribute to a reduction in cholesterol.

Cucumbers are mostly enzyme-filled water (about 96 percent) and contain vitamins A, B and C, zinc, iron, folic acid, calcium, magnesium, and potassium. All of this nutritional love can give you a quick pick-me-up without overloading the calories. Plus, cucumbers are great for the complexion because of their silica content, which boosts skin's moisture and elasticity.